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I'm trying to create a summarizer in Java. I'm using the Stanford Log-linear Part-Of-Speech Tagger to tag the words, and then, for certain tags, I'm scoring the sentence and finally in the summary, I'm printing sentences with a high score value. Here's the code:

    MaxentTagger tagger = new MaxentTagger("taggers/bidirectional-distsim-wsj-0-18.tagger");

    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader( new FileReader ("C:\\Summarizer\\src\\summarizer\\testing\\testingtext.txt"));
    String line  = null;
    int score = 0;
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    File tempFile = new File("C:\\Summarizer\\src\\summarizer\\testing\\tempFile.txt");
    Writer writerForTempFile = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(tempFile));


    String ls = System.getProperty("line.separator");
    while( ( line = reader.readLine() ) != null )
    {
        stringBuilder.append( line );
        stringBuilder.append( ls );
        String tagged = tagger.tagString(line);
        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("[.?!]"); //Find new line
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(tagged);
        while(matcher.find())
        {
            Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("/JJ"); // find adjective tag
            Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(matcher.group());
            while(tagMatcher.find())
            {
                score++; // increase score of sentence for every occurence of adjective tag
            }
            if(score > 1)
                writerForTempFile.write(stringBuilder.toString());
            score = 0;
            stringBuilder.setLength(0);
        }

    }

    reader.close();
    writerForTempFile.close();

The above code isn't working. Although, if I cut my work and generate score for every line(not sentence),it works. But summaries aren't generated that way,are they? Here's the code for that: (all the declarations being the same as above)

while( ( line = reader.readLine() ) != null )
        {
            stringBuilder.append( line );
            stringBuilder.append( ls );
            String tagged = tagger.tagString(line);
            Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("/JJ"); // find adjective tag
            Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(tagged);
            while(tagMatcher.find())
            {
                score++;  //increase score of line for every occurence of adjective tag
            }
            if(score > 1)
                writerForTempFile.write(stringBuilder.toString());
            score = 0;
            stringBuilder.setLength(0);
        }

EDIT 1:

Information regarding what the MaxentTagger does. A sample code to show it's functioning :

import java.io.IOException;

import edu.stanford.nlp.tagger.maxent.MaxentTagger;

public class TagText {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException,
            ClassNotFoundException {

        // Initialize the tagger
        MaxentTagger tagger = new MaxentTagger(
                "taggers/bidirectional-distsim-wsj-0-18.tagger");

        // The sample string
        String sample = "This is a sample text";

        // The tagged string
        String tagged = tagger.tagString(sample);

        // Output the result
        System.out.println(tagged);
    }
}

Output:

This/DT is/VBZ a/DT sample/NN sentence/NN

EDIT 2:

Modified code using BreakIterator to find sentence breaks. Yet the problem is persisting.

while( ( line = reader.readLine() ) != null )
        {
            stringBuilder.append( line );
            stringBuilder.append( ls );
            String tagged = tagger.tagString(line);
            BreakIterator bi = BreakIterator.getSentenceInstance();
            bi.setText(tagged);
            int end, start = bi.first();
            while ((end = bi.next()) != BreakIterator.DONE)
            {
                String sentence = tagged.substring(start, end);
                Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("/JJ");
                Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(sentence);
                while(tagMatcher.find())
                {
                    score++;
                }
                scoreTracker.add(score);
                if(score > 1)
                    writerForTempFile.write(stringBuilder.toString());
                score = 0;
                stringBuilder.setLength(0);
                start = end;
            }
share|improve this question
    
I have no knowledge on your MaxentTagger, but your matcher.group() will only return a dot, a question mark or an exclamation mark, so I doubt that your second matcher will ever work. What you probably want is the text in between your matches, so you should have a look at the doc of appendReplacement()in the Matcher class –  Guillaume Polet Mar 14 '12 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Finding sentence breaks can be a bit more involved than just looking for [.?!], consider using BreakIterator.getSentenceInstance()

Its performance is actually quite similar to LingPipe's (more complex) implementation, and better than the one in OpenNLP (from my own testing, at least).

Sample Code

BreakIterator bi = BreakIterator.getSentenceInstance();
bi.setText(text);
int end, start = bi.first();
while ((end = bi.next()) != BreakIterator.DONE) {
    String sentence = text.substring(start, end);
    start = end;
}

Edit

I think this is what you're looking for:

    Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("/JJ");
    BufferedReader reader = getMyReader();
    String line = null;
    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        BreakIterator bi = BreakIterator.getSentenceInstance();
        bi.setText(line);
        int end, start = bi.first();
        while ((end = bi.next()) != BreakIterator.DONE) {
            String sentence = line.substring(start, end);
            String tagged = tagger.tagString(sentence);
            int score = 0;
            Matcher tag = tagFinder.matcher(tagged);
            while (tag.find())
                score++;
            if (score > 1)
                writerForTempFile.println(sentence);
            start = end;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to find sentence breaks perfectly. But my code still isn't working as expected. I'll post the edited code once again. –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 13:41
    
What do you expect it to do? The code to count /JJ tags looks correct. You may want to break sentences first, and tag each sentence individually, but that probably doesn't make much of a difference. What does scoreTracker do? Also not really sure what the StringBuilder is for. –  Dmitri Mar 14 '12 at 15:00
    
scoreTracker is just an ArrayList to keep track of scores of every sentence. That's just for debugging. Just forgot to remove it. –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 15:02
    
But the use of scoreTracker generates the following scores: [0, 1, 2, 4, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0] . This is quite helpful to see that the count is going correctly, and indeed all those respective sentences have those number of adjectives. But when it comes to writing those particular sentences into the other file, that's where I'm getting undesirable output. –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 15:04
    
See my edit, I think the odd scoping and nested loops were just making it hard to see what's actually being printed. –  Dmitri Mar 14 '12 at 15:37

Without understanding it all, my guess would be that your code should more be like this:

    int lastMatch = 0;// Added

    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("[.?!]"); //Find new line
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(tagged);
    while(matcher.find())
    {
        Pattern tagFinder = Pattern.compile("/JJ"); // find adjective tag

        // HERE START OF MY CHANGE
        String sentence = tagged.substring(lastMatch, matcher.end());
        lastMatch = matcher.end();
        Matcher tagMatcher = tagFinder.matcher(sentence);
        // HERE END OF MY CHANGE

        while(tagMatcher.find())
        {
            score++; // increase score of sentence for every occurence of adjective tag
        }
        if(score > 1)
            writerForTempFile.write(sentence);
        score = 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I need to find the substring. The documentation for matcher.group() says : For a matcher m with input sequence s, the expressions m.group() and s.substring(m.start(), m.end()) are equivalent. –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 13:33
    
Well, if we make the asumption that a sentence is never spread over several lines (otherwise you should seriously consider rewriting the code), then yes you should work on that substring. Moreover, your stringbuilder is useless. And the writerForTempFile.write should also write that same substring. Giove me a few minutes to adapt the code –  Guillaume Polet Mar 14 '12 at 13:41
    
A sentence might be spread over several lines and a line might even contain many sentences. Wow, a new issue to ponder upon. :-| –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 13:43
1  
Yes, your previous comment is right, but that is not what I am doing. I am using the substring between the end of the previous match and the end (was start, but end is better actually) of the current match, i.e., everything between two matches. One more thing, I was mistaking on your stringbuilder, it is actually useful. –  Guillaume Polet Mar 14 '12 at 13:44
    
One drawback in your code : my testing input file has 8 sentences, but it shows 16 sentences generated by your code. I guess the same issue we have discussed in the above comments. –  Kazekage Gaara Mar 14 '12 at 14:07

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