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I have the following models:

class Release < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :products, :dependent => :destroy
  has_and_belongs_to_many :tracks
end

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
 belongs_to :release
 has_many :releases_tracks, :through => :release, :source => :tracks      
 has_and_belongs_to_many :tracks
 before_save do
   self.track_ids = self.releases_track_ids
 end        
end

class Track < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :releases
end

class ReleaseTracks < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :release
  belongs_to :track
end

class ProductsTracks < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :track
end

At the moment I can create a release and add tracks to it. When I then create a product it inherits the tracks from the release.

What I want to do is be able to delete individual tracks at the product level, but not the track entry itself, so delete the association in ProductsTracks.

How would I go about writing the appropriate destroy method, which controller should it reside in and how should the link_to be structured?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you tried just destroying the tracks at the product level? I believe the default behavior is to destroy the relationship, and not the record at the other end of the relationship.

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I'm actually having trouble doing that!! How should I structure my link_to? –  Ryan Berry Mar 15 '12 at 14:13
    
Hmm, just off the top of my head (untested), it's something like link_to product_track_path(@product, @track_to_delete), :method => :delete assuming you have a nested route of tracks under products. –  jefflunt Mar 15 '12 at 14:17

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