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ive already started it, but i dont have clue how to put some numbers on the clock. estimating lines is such a pain. =/ any idea how to do it easier and faster? x-x here's my code.

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class DrawingProject extends JFrame
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
{
        DrawingProject frame = new DrawingProject();
        frame.setSize(750, 750);
        frame.setVisible(true);
}

public void paint(Graphics g)
{
    g.drawOval(170, 170, 300, 300);
    g.drawLine(235, 235, 330, 330);
    g.drawLine(235, 235, 237, 257);
    g.drawLine(235, 235, 257, 237);
    g.drawLine(330, 255, 330, 330);
    g.drawLine(330, 255, 345, 270);
    g.drawLine(330, 255, 313, 270);


}
}
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6  
What do you meant by a faster Clock? If it's a clock, it is meant to run with other clocks, but if it will run fast, will it be a clock of any use ? :-) Better put your Swing Clock in space, that will make it run faster, than others on the ground :-) –  nIcE cOw Mar 14 '12 at 14:15
2  
A faster clock? Like one that can do a second in just 900ms? ;) –  Andreas_D Mar 14 '12 at 14:15
    
"..better and faster wall clock.." If better is 'positioning' and faster is 'to code', maybe the solution is to make it a digital clock. ;) –  Andrew Thompson Mar 14 '12 at 14:19
    
@GagandeepBali "Better put your Swing Clock in space, that will make it run faster, than others on the ground" Tut, tut. Only if your clock is in a lesser gravitational field than a clock on the ground (e.g. not close proximity to a black hole), and not traveling really, really fast (relative to the observer). –  Andrew Thompson Mar 14 '12 at 14:23
    
My last clock program can be found here: java-forums: timer loop. Not a bad little clock if I must say so myself. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 14 '12 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

Consider using polar coordinates for that. With it you give every point as a distance from th ecenter (which is always the same) and a rotation angle (which you increment for every number).

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Use polar coordinates to realize where to locate the numbers. A full circle has 360 degrees. There are 12 hours which means that starting from angle 0 every 30 degrees a number has to be placed.

Here's a full example.

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wall clock doesnt have to be moving. just a design. ._. kinda confuse with all those codes and comments. x-x –  Mark Dizon Mar 14 '12 at 14:53

First off, its bad practice to draw your line using hard coded coordinates. Especially if these coordinates can be calculated using some trivial geometry. Clicking on the first link provided to you, we see these formulas:

// polar to Cartesian
double x = Math.cos( angleInRadians ) * radius;
double y = Math.sin( angleInRadians ) * radius;

// Cartesian to polar.
double radius = Math.sqrt( x * x + y * y );
double angleInRadians = Math.acos( x / radius );

source: mindprod.com

The first two lines do exactly what you want! They calculate the distance traveled on an axis in a certain angle. We can use these formulas to calculate the destination point of your lines. For the starting point we will be using the center of the frame.

Now lets put these formulas into some methods:

private int calculateHorizontalOffset(int angle, int radius) {
    return (int) Math.round(Math.cos(Math.toRadians(angle)) * radius);
}

private int calculateVerticalOffset(int angle, int radius) {
    return (int) Math.round(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(angle)) * radius);
}

Now its easy to calculate the coordinates of your lines, here's the final result:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class DrawingProject extends JFrame {

    /**
     * This is the size of our clock
     */
    int radius = 300;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        DrawingProject frame = new DrawingProject();
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setSize(750, 750);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    private int calculateHorizontalOffset(int angle, int radius) {
        return (int) Math.round(Math.cos(Math.toRadians(angle)) * radius);
    }

    private int calculateVerticalOffset(int angle, int radius) {
        return (int) Math.round(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(angle)) * radius);
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {

        int offsetX, offsetY;
        //here we calculate the center of our drawing pane
        int centerX = getWidth() / 2;
        int centerY = getHeight() / 2;

        //then we draw a circle using the data we have so far
        g.drawOval(centerX - radius / 2, centerY - radius / 2, radius, radius);

        //then, with our formulas, we create a line to the left (angle = 0)
        offsetX = calculateHorizontalOffset(0, radius / 2 - 50);
        offsetY = calculateVerticalOffset(0, radius / 2 - 50);
        g.drawLine(centerX, centerY, centerX + offsetX, centerY + offsetY);

        //and a second line to the top (angle = 270)
        offsetX = calculateHorizontalOffset(270, radius / 2 - 10);
        offsetY = calculateVerticalOffset(270, radius / 2 - 10);
        g.drawLine(centerX, centerY, centerX + offsetX, centerY + offsetY);
    }
}

Another tip, the default closing operation of a JFrame is HIDE_ON_CLOSE. Just hiding the frame is usually not enough. We want to close the application as soon as the window is closed. I used EXIT_ON_CLOSE for this.

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