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I have seen many examples regarding calculating the sum of fields using the fiscal year, but I can not find one that fits my needs. What I am trying to do is get just the current fiscal year totals for a field using SQL Query. The fields I have is userid, startdate, total_hours, and missed_hours. Here is the query I have so far:

SELECT    
userid,    
SUM(total_hours) - SUM(missed_hours) AS hours    
FROM mytable    
GROUP BY userid

This works great, but all I need is the total number of hours for the current fiscal year for each of the userid's. Our fiscal year runs from July to June. I only need the current fiscal year and I need it to start over again this coming July.

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What startdate field mean? –  Sergey P. aka azure Mar 14 '12 at 14:42
    
startdate is the "date" field that will be used to figure in the query for the fiscal year. Thanks –  user1212436 Mar 14 '12 at 14:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming this is SQLServer, try:

SELECT userid, SUM(total_hours) - SUM(missed_hours) AS hours    
FROM mytable
WHERE startdate >= cast( cast(year(dateadd(MM,-6,getdate())) as varchar(4)) + 
                         '-07-01' as date ) and
      startdate <  cast( cast(year(dateadd(MM, 6,getdate())) as varchar(4)) + 
                         '-07-01' as date )
GROUP BY userid
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this, but got the error: Incorrect syntax near ','. –  user1212436 Mar 14 '12 at 15:16
    
There was a typo in my query that I have now corrected - if you are using SQLServer, this should now work. –  Mark Bannister Mar 14 '12 at 15:20
    
Just took out the extra "," in the second part of the where statement. I had to change date to datetime. This works for me. Thanks! –  user1212436 Mar 14 '12 at 15:22
1  
In SQL Server you can also CAST('2012' AS date), which would result in the date of 2012-01-01. So, for instance, the beginning of the current fiscal year could also be found like this: DATEADD(MONTH, -6, CAST(DATENAME(YEAR, GETDATE()) AS date)). –  Andriy M Mar 14 '12 at 15:33

Add a where clause:

FROM mytable
WHERE startdate >= '2011-07-01'
GROUP BY userid

Or with the start of the year dynamically:

where startdate >= dateadd(yy, datepart(yy, getdate())-2001, '2000-07-01')
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't donwvote you, and I know that is a simple fix, but op asked for fiscal year and said that their fiscal year runs from July to June –  Lamak Mar 14 '12 at 14:47
    
Ah I was wondering, updated in the answer –  Andomar Mar 14 '12 at 14:50
    
And now you get a +1 from me... –  Lamak Mar 14 '12 at 14:55

Maybe something like this:

SELECT
    userid,
    SUM(total_hours) - SUM(missed_hours) AS hours
FROM 
    mytable
WHERE 
    MONTH(startdate) BETWEEN 6 AND 7
    AND YEAR(startdate) IN (2011,2012)
GROUP BY userid
share|improve this answer

For the solution, two additional information is needed

  • the name of the date column
  • the vendor type of RDBMS you are using

I supposed your date column is date_col and you are using MySQL

SELECT    
userid,    
SUM(total_hours) - SUM(missed_hours) AS hours    
FROM mytable    
WHERE date_col between STR_TO_DATE('01,7,2011','%d,%m,%Y') and STR_TO_DATE('01,7,2010','%d,%m,%Y')
GROUP BY userid
share|improve this answer

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