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Consider the following code:

public class AccountNumber
{
    [AccountNumber] //This validator confirms the format of the account number 
    public string Value {get; set;}

    public int Format { get; set;}

    public string ToString() 
    {
        return Value + " is format " + Format;
    }
}

public class MyViewModel
{
     public MyViewModel()
     {
          SourceAccount = new AccountNumber();
          DestinationAccount= new AccountNumber();
     }

     [Required]
     AccountNumber SourceAccount {get; set;}

     AccountNumber DestinationAccount {get; set;} 
}

And then, in my View:

@Html.EditorFor(model => model.SourceAccount.Value)
@Html.EditorFor(model => model.DestinationAccount.Value)

Basically, I want to say that the user must enter a Source Account, and that they optionally enter a Destination Account. However, if they do enter a Destination Account it must conform to a certain format.

The problem with the code above is that the required validator on the SourceAccount will always return valid, as SourceAccount is never null. What would be a good approach for implementing what I am trying to achieve?

Please note that in real-life the setter for Value is more complex than shown, as it reformats the account number in a canonical format.

Edit Please note that we have to use inbuilt MVC validation, as that is what the rest of the project is currently using.

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3 Answers 3

See Extending the Model Binder for Enhanced Validation.
This is fully compatible with built-in MVC validation.

You can - of course - customize this solution by using your own interface for validation.

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A simple approach could be to add simple string properties for the SourceAccount and DestinationAccount numbers as follows:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public MyViewModel()
    {
    }

    [Required]
    [AccountNumber]
    public string SourceAccountNumber { get; set; }

    [AccountNumber]
    public string DestinationAccountNumber { get; set; }

    public AccountNumber SourceAccount
    {
        get
        {
            return new AccountNumber
            {
                Value = SourceAccountNumber,
                Format = 0 // Set Format appropriately
            };
        }
    }

    public AccountNumber DestinationAccount
    {
        get
        {
            return new AccountNumber
            {
                Value = DestinationAccountNumber,
                Format = 0 // Set Format appropriately
            };
        }
    }
}
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Maybe you'd like to try FluentValidation, it's a model validation alternative to data annotation attributes, which allows you to add more complex model validation logic.

The code is still pretty concise and straightforward:

[Validator(typeof(PersonValidator))]
public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

public class PersonValidator : AbstractValidator<Person>
{
    public PersonValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Id).NotNull();
        RuleFor(x => x.Name).Length(0, 10);
        RuleFor(x => x.Email).EmailAddress();
        RuleFor(x => x.Age).InclusiveBetween(18, 60);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion Nico. Unfortunately we have to use MVC validation as the project currently uses that. I've made that clear in the question now. –  RB. Mar 14 '12 at 15:08

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