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How to concat all column values from differenct rows returned from a sql query into one value? This is an example:

a query returns:

FOO
------
RES1

RES2

RES3

now I want to have a result like the following one:

FOOCONCAT
-----
RES1RES2RES3

Are there any ways to do this in sql?

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Which server are you using? I doubt there's a generic SQL way to do it but there are certainly implementation specific methods. –  Stephen Darlington Jun 9 '09 at 14:56
1  
I'm using Oracle. I'm astonished that there is no easy way to do this in oracle. –  paweloque Jun 9 '09 at 15:34
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10 Answers

In SQL Server:

SELECT  col1 AS [text()]
FROM    foo
FOR XML PATH ('')

In MySQL:

SELECT  GROUP_CONCAT(col1 SEPARATOR '')
FROM    foo

In PostgreSQL:

SELECT  array_to_string
        (
        ARRAY
        (
        SELECT  col1
        FROM    foo
        ), ''
        )

In Oracle:

SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  col1, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY 1) AS rn
        FROM    foo
        MODEL
        DIMENSION BY
                (rn)
        MEASURES
                (col1, col1 AS group_concat, 0 AS mark)
        RULES UPDATE (
                group_concat[rn > 1] =  group_concat[CV() - 1] || col1[CV()],
                mark[ANY] = PRESENTV(mark[CV() + 1], 0, 1)
                )
        )
WHERE   mark = 1
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1  
looks like a solution, but how would this look like in oracle? –  paweloque Jun 9 '09 at 14:52
1  
@lewap: Patience! –  Quassnoi Jun 9 '09 at 14:55
    
That's a cool trick in SQL Server, I would just change the select to: SELECT REPLACE(REPLACE(col1, '<col1>', ''), '</col1>', '') –  RedFilter Jun 9 '09 at 15:00
    
@OrbMan: there is better way, see post update –  Quassnoi Jun 9 '09 at 15:13
    
@Quassnoi - I get "Column name 'Text()' contains an invalid XML identifier as required by FOR XML; '('(0x0028) is the first character at fault." on SQL Server 2005 –  RedFilter Jun 10 '09 at 18:27
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Quassnoi's Oracle solution is quite impressive, but I found simpler ones using SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH() rather than the MODEL magic.

SELECT REPLACE(MAX(SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH(foo, '/')), '/', '') conc
FROM (
    SELECT T_FOO.*, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY FOO) R FROM T_FOO
)
START WITH r=1
CONNECT BY PRIOR r = r-1;
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Nice, I was able to use this. Good job. –  contactmatt Dec 4 '09 at 20:35
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The mysql way:

select group_concat(somecolumn separator '') from sometable
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turned out not to be quite what i needed but i can tell this is gonna be really useful sometime –  jsh Jan 17 '12 at 1:11
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Assuming that it's one column with multiple values, this approach works for MS SQL Server (I can't speak for other systems).

declare @result varchar(max)
set @result = ''

select @result = @result + RES
from (query goes here)
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Here is the answer you are looking for; I had a feeling the solution lay in the CONNECT BY operation, I just hadn't used the SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH pseudocolumn before (which displays the full path to the node in a tree, separating node names by a "/"). Assuming that your set of "foo" values before are multiple rows in a table, grouped by a column "myKey", e.g.:

myKey    foo
-------- ----------
group 1  apple
group 1  orange
group 1  pear
group 2  ape
group 2  bear
group 2  kitten

you can treat the data as if it were a tree schema, and pretend that the values of each group represent nodes going down a branch. In that case, you'd do this:

  SELECT myKey
       , SUBSTR(MAX(REPLACE(SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH(foo, '/')
                           ,'/'
                           ,' '
                           )
                   )
               ,2
               ) FooConcat
    FROM ( SELECT MyKey
                , Foo
                , row_number() OVER (Partition by myKey order by myKey) NodeDepth
             FROM MyTable
         )
   START WITH NodeDepth = 1
 CONNECT BY PRIOR myKey = myKey
     AND PRIOR NodeDepth = NodeDepth -1
GROUP BY myKey
;

Of course, the order of the concatenated values would be random; if your table had another column ("bar") that you could use as an ordering field that was ascending and contiguous, you could dispense with the subquery (which only exists to put an imaginary depth to the tree) and use the table directly, replacing NodeDepth with bar.

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Edit: Since version 8.4.0 CUBRID provides 90% compatibility with MySQL. Thus, it supports GROUP_CONCAT which has similar syntax as in MySQL:

CREATE TABLE t(i int);
INSERT INTO t VALUES (4),(2),(3),(6),(1),(5);

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(i*2+1 ORDER BY 1 SEPARATOR '') FROM t;

group_concat(i*2+1 order by 1 separator '')
======================
  '35791113'

Quite powerful, isn't it? And below is an alternative solution supported natively in CUBRID.

SELECT MAX(SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH(s_name, '')) AS conc_s_name
FROM (
     SELECT ROWNUM AS r, s_name FROM code
) AS res
START WITH r = 1
CONNECT BY PRIOR r = r - 1;

It's so interesting that this way of concatenating different row column values in CUBRID is almost identical to Oracle's way as provided by @devio. In CUBRID it looks a little bit easier though.

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select cast(res1 as varchar)+cast(res2 as varchar)+cast(res3 as varchar) as fooconcat from foo

If the columns are already strings you do not need the cast, you can just do:

select res1 + res2 + res3  as fooconcat from foo

For data from multiple rows, use PIVOT.

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and how do you do the same for a arbitrary number of values? –  paweloque Jun 9 '09 at 14:49
    
res1, res2 and res3 are not columns but values. The column is 'foo'. –  paweloque Jun 9 '09 at 14:51
    
Sorry, when I answered this your data was formatted all on one line, so the question appeared to be a different one. –  RedFilter Jun 9 '09 at 15:01
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Concatenating strings depends on the database you are using (you havnt mentioned what version in your question so here goes)...

In Oracle and DB2 you can use the CONCAT function... CONCAT(string, string)

SQL Server you can use the '+' operator... string1 + string2 + string3

In MySQL it is CONCAT(string, string... n_string)

Finally in PostgreSQL it is TEXTCAT(string, string)...

...I got this out of this little cool book I have sitting on my desk SQL Pocket Guide from O'Reilly... check it out!

:)

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Those only really work with strings from the same row. –  Stephen Darlington Jun 9 '09 at 14:57
    
I know what you mean, you would do something like... Select @Text = @Text + RES, or Select @Text = CONCAT(@Text, RES) etc to concatenate the columns. –  Chalkey Jun 9 '09 at 17:26
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It might not be what you're looking for, but I've had good luck in the past with constructions like this:

SELECT      MAX(DECODE(fookey, 1, foo, NULL))
         || MAX(DECODE(fookey, 2, foo, NULL))
         || MAX(DECODE(fookey, 3, foo, NULL))
         || MAX(DECODE(fookey, 4, foo, NULL))
       , groupingvalue
    FROM mytable
GROUP BY groupingvalue;

It's platform independent, and it works well when you have a arbitrary, but limited number of values for foo, and they're based on some other key value. For example, if you have a table of invoices, and you want to see all the line times from the invoice on a single row, concatenated, and you have an upper limit of 5 line items, it would look like this:

SELECT      MAX(DECODE(lineno, 1, foo, NULL))
         || ', '
         || MAX(DECODE(lineno, 2, foo, NULL))
         || ', '
         || MAX(DECODE(lineno, 3, foo, NULL))
         || ', '
         || MAX(DECODE(lineno, 4, foo, NULL))
         || ', '
         || MAX(DECODE(lineno, 5, foo, NULL))
       , invoiceid
    FROM lineitem
GROUP BY invoiceid;
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Select ([col1] +','+[col2]+','+ [col3]+','+[col4]) as [MyCol] From [Table]

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3  
the goal is to concatenate rows, not columns –  Benjamin Delichere Jan 21 '11 at 12:30
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