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I'm working on Windows 8 CP and discovered that in my app, I'm unable to properly get the new async/await mechanism to work.

This method I am showing you will work when run as a UnitTest (called from a unit test) but when ran normally, it DOES NOT WORK!

StreamSocket _client;

private void Start() {
     SomeMethod();
     SomeOtherMethod();
}

private async void SomeMethod(string sample)
{
    var request = new GetSampleRequestObject(sample);
    byte[] payload = ConvertToByteArray(request, Encoding.UTF8);

    DataWriter writer = new DataWriter(_client.OutputStream);
    writer.WriteBytes(payload);
    await writer.StoreAsync(); // <--- after this executes, it exits the method and continues
    await writer.FlushAsync(); // <--- breakpoint never reaches here, instead
    writer.DetachStream();
}

private void SomeOtherMethod()
{
    string hello = "hello"; // <--- it skips everything and reaches here!
}

What gives?

share|improve this question
    
What does it do instead of work? How does it behave? – Ben Robinson Mar 14 '12 at 15:30
    
See inline comments showing execution. – Brian Liang Mar 14 '12 at 15:32
    
Sorry i missed those. – Ben Robinson Mar 14 '12 at 15:33
2  
An async void method is "fire and forget" - when you call it, it starts executing asynchronously, and returns to the caller immediately. This is by design. If you want to wait for it to complete, you need to make it return a Task, and await on that in the caller. – Pavel Minaev Mar 14 '12 at 16:46
    
Yep, but the problem is when I do that, it gets stuck on the first await method, even though the message was sent. – Brian Liang Mar 14 '12 at 16:54

I think you have to put await in front of your initial SomeMethod call in the Start function:

await SomeMethod();

share|improve this answer
    
But then why would it work in a unit test? – Brian Liang Mar 14 '12 at 15:38
    
Sorry, I don't know that. But with the await keyword it should behave the same in both situations. If you call an async function/method it returns to the caller when it reaches the first line that also has an await at the beginning (most of the time if the operation in question is not finished immediately). – Daniel Schlößer Mar 14 '12 at 15:43
    
Maybe that in your unit tests the async operations you await return immediately so they are not really asynchronously executed. During normal runs they really do something that takes a little bit of time. – Daniel Schlößer Mar 14 '12 at 15:46
1  
If you're using the async unit test support, then it works because it gets the test back as a Task and then waits on it to complete (AFAIK) – James Manning Mar 15 '12 at 5:56
    
You can't await an async method that returns void. What exactly would you be awaiting? – svick Mar 15 '12 at 18:46

I think Daniel Schlößer's answer may has some other problem. Here are my improved method:

private async void Start() {
    await SomeMethod();
    SomeOtherMethod();
}

An async function should be called with "await" at the beginning surely. But the function which use async function should be signed "async" as well.

That's my point. Thanks

share|improve this answer

Since it sounds like you want SomeMethod to complete before calling SomeOtherMethod, you need to have it return a Task and wait on that task to complete. All you need to do is change the 'async void' in the declaration to 'async Task' and then in the Start method, change the caller to SomeMethod().Wait();

As it stands, since you're not waiting for anything about the task to complete, once the method exits (hitting the first await), there's nothing to 'block' anything else on it having completed.

Using 'async void' means you don't care when it completes (or perhaps even if it completes). If you do care, you need to use 'async Task' and then use that appropriately.

Not sure if it'll help explain, but here's a blog post I did on the subject:

http://blog.sublogic.com/2012/03/06/async-lesson-2-of-n-async-void-probably-isnt-what-you-want/

share|improve this answer
1  
You should never call Wait() on the UI thread. Instead, you should await the result. – svick Mar 15 '12 at 18:47
    
agreed, sorry I missed that this was happening on the UI thread – James Manning Mar 15 '12 at 22:24

I think you should edit:

StreamSocket _client;

private async Task Start() {
    await SomeMethod();
     SomeOtherMethod();
}

private async Task SomeMethod(string sample)
{
    var request = new GetSampleRequestObject(sample);
    byte[] payload = ConvertToByteArray(request, Encoding.UTF8);

    DataWriter writer = new DataWriter(_client.OutputStream);
    writer.WriteBytes(payload);
    await writer.StoreAsync(); // <--- after this executes, it exits the method and continues
    await writer.FlushAsync(); // <--- breakpoint never reaches here, instead
    writer.DetachStream();
}

private void SomeOtherMethod()
{
    string hello = "hello"; // <--- it skips everything and reaches here!
}

I hope help you

share|improve this answer

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