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My SQL isn't bad but SQLite on iOS constantly catches me out.

I have a table where I want to limit the number of rows to around 500, so when it hits a trigger point of say 550 it will delete the earliest 50 rows.

It's rolling so with time the id wont always start at one and the user can delete rows so the id is non-sequential.

I have a juliandate field (double) but I'm not sure that's any use

DELETE FROM contents WHERE id > '0' ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 0, 50
DELETE FROM contents ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 0, 50

Documentation says that's OK but it fails. Any ideas?

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How does it fail? Error message, or just doesn't delete anything or deletes the wrong things? Why don't you use the date field so you can delete the oldest 50? –  Nick Bull Mar 14 '12 at 16:00
    
@NickBull, 1. Sqlite3 is not that verbose about errors: Error: near "LIMIT": syntax error. 2. there might not be a date field. –  Misha Akovantsev Mar 14 '12 at 16:55
    
@MishaAkovantsev 1. That error message is plenty enough to see that there is a syntax error rather than the error being that the wrong records are deleted. 2. The OP says "I have a juliandate field" –  Nick Bull Mar 14 '12 at 21:18
    
@NickBull 1. true, but was not helpful for me. 2. true, overlooked it completely. –  Misha Akovantsev Mar 15 '12 at 11:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

something along these lines, maybe?

delete from contents where juliandate <= (
    select max(juliandate) from (
        select juliandate from contents order by juliandate limit 0, 50));

You can use id instead of juliandate or any other field which value increases with every insert.

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StackOverflow - making the internet more awesome than porn and kittens alone can - thank you user1096188! –  JulianB Mar 14 '12 at 17:38
    
This didn't work for me, while thecr0w's answer did. Check that one out if this doesn't work for you. –  Vern Jensen Jan 13 at 20:56
DELETE FROM contents WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM t ORDER BY id ASC LIMIT 50)

DESC means 5,4,3,2,1, use it to delete the freshest records.
ASC means 1,2,3,4,5, use it to delete the earliest records.

Here is an example:

$ sqlite3 /tmp/del_rows.sqlite3
CREATE TABLE t (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, value TEXT);
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('a');
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('b');
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('c');
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('d');
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('e');
INSERT INTO t (value) VALUES ('f');
SELECT * FROM t;
-- 1|a
-- 2|b
-- 3|c
-- 4|d
-- 5|e
-- 6|f

-- Deleting 2 top rows:
DELETE FROM t WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM t ORDER BY id ASC LIMIT 2);
SELECT * FROM t;
-- 3|c
-- 4|d
-- 5|e
-- 6|f

-- And again:
DELETE FROM t WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM t ORDER BY id ASC LIMIT 2);
SELECT * FROM t;
-- 5|e
-- 6|f
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This will delete n rows each time, but not "Delete all but latest 500 rows".That means keep latest 500 records, I think. –  thecr0w Jun 28 '13 at 1:33

Keep latest 500 records:

delete from table_name where _id not in (select _id from table_name order by _id desc limit 500)

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1  
Works for me, when the accepted answer didn't. Upvoting! –  Vern Jensen Jan 13 at 20:56
    
congratulations, but it just depends. –  thecr0w Jan 15 at 2:05

Try this out. This should be what you are looking for:

DELETE FROM contents WHERE id IN 
    (SELECT id FROM contents ORDER BY id LIMIT 50 ASC);

Hope this helps you.

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btw. i found similar question there: stackoverflow.com/questions/6528117/… –  Evgen Bodunov Mar 14 '12 at 16:16
    
Alas no, not sure why not but SQLite seems extra fanickity. –  JulianB Mar 14 '12 at 17:36
    
Do you mean keep latest 500 records? –  thecr0w Jun 28 '13 at 1:34

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