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I have this method that Starts a Task and returns the last cahined Task to get the result:

public Task<double> GetTask()
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew((() => 10))
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return i.Result + 2;
        })
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return (double)i.Result;
        });
}

I would like to have the same method returning the same task but without starting it automatically with the Task.Factory.StartNew like this:

public Task<double> GetTask2()
{
    return new Task<int>((() => 10))
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return i.Result + 2;
        })
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return (double)i.Result;
        });
}

Anyway I wasn't able to find a way to start the task returned by GetTask2 and get the result. How can I start it and get the result?

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4 Answers

You could create another Task, that starts the parent Task, then sets up the continuation and returns the result of the continuation. Although it has the disadvantage that it may block one thread while waiting for the one that actually computes that continuations to complete.

public static Task<double> GetTask()
{
    return new Task<double>(
        () => Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 10)
                  .ContinueWith(
                      i =>
                      {
                          return i.Result + 2;
                      })
                  .ContinueWith(
                      i =>
                      {
                          return (double)i.Result;
                      }).Result);
}
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Something like this:

public Task<double> GetTask()
{
    var rootTask = new Task<int>((() => 10));
    var continuationTask = rootTask
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return i.Result + 2;
        })
        .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            return (double)i.Result;
        });
    rootTask.Start(),
    return continuationTask;
}

If you want to start the task only later, you can return both from your function.

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This is a feasible solution but not the answer to my question. Thank you anyway. –  gigi Mar 14 '12 at 17:43
    
What did I miss regarding your question? Why is this feasible, but not an answer? –  usr Mar 14 '12 at 17:45
    
The point is that I dont'want to return a tuple but the task returning the final result and be able to sart it, like for example: task.Root().Start(). If you read the question title, it's explicit. –  gigi Mar 15 '12 at 8:51
    
This is not possible, sorry. You can only start the original task. –  usr Mar 15 '12 at 11:08
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You could do something like the following. As an example I have created three TextBoxs for illustration purposes.

First select your required task using a method like

public Task<double> GetTask()
{
    // Return choice of task.
    return new Task<double>(() => 10.0);
}

Then build the continuation for that selected Task using a method like (ommitting error handling)

public Task<double> DefineTaskContinuation(Task<double> _task)
{
    _task.ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            textBox2.Text = (i.Result + 2).ToString();
            return i.Result + 2;
        }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
    .ContinueWith(i =>
        {
            textBox3.Text = (i.Result + 2).ToString();
        }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
     return _task;
}

The if you have a form with textBox1, textBox2 and textBox3, you could fill these text boxes utilising the output from the countinuation as follows

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Task<double> task = DefineTaskContinuation(GetTask());
    task.Start();
    textBox1.Text = task.Result.ToString();
} 

Output:

The Results

I hope this helps.

Edit: Due to the very correct comments by @usr, the answer has been changed. Note that the TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() is not a requirement, but is used to facilitate my printing output to the UI thread. All the best.

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1  
This won't work. You need to start the original, first task. Not the last of the chain. –  usr Mar 14 '12 at 16:22
    
Why? That's not the question. Just instantiate the task from the method. Then start it. Simple. –  Killercam Mar 14 '12 at 16:24
1  
You are calling start on the continuation task. You can't start the continuation task. It will auto-start when its antecendent is completed. You cannot force it to start. –  usr Mar 14 '12 at 17:09
    
No. The continuation is part of the return new Task<int>.... When you run the Task returned from the method it will automatically invoke the continuation when it is finished. –  Killercam Mar 14 '12 at 17:13
    
I need to check this out to be sure... 1 min. –  Killercam Mar 14 '12 at 17:14
show 1 more comment
[TestFixture]
public class TaskTester
{
    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        Tuple<Task<int>, Task<double>> result = GetResult();
        result.Item1.Start();
        Assert.That(result.Item2.Result, Is.EqualTo(12));
    }

    private static Tuple<Task<int>, Task<double>> GetResult()
    {
        var task1 = new Task<int>(() => 10);
        Task<int> task2 = task1.ContinueWith(i => i.Result + 2);
        Task<double> task3 = task2.ContinueWith(i => (double)i.Result);
        return new Tuple<Task<int>, Task<double>>(task1, task3);
    }
}
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