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I have two gcc compilers installed on my system, one is gcc 4.1.2 (default) and the other is gcc 4.4.4. How can I check the libc version used by gcc 4.4.4, because /lib/libc.so.6 shows the glibc used by gcc 4.1.2, since it is the default compiler.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Write a test program (name it for example glibc-version.c):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <gnu/libc-version.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  printf("GNU libc version: %s\n", gnu_get_libc_version());
  exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

and compile it with the gcc-4.4 compiler:

gcc-4.4 glibc-version.c -o glibc-version

When you execute ./glibc-version the used glibc version is shown.

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it works for me, but where is this docummented? I'm looking at the glibc 2.7 docs but I can't find it. –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 Jun 27 '13 at 9:58
    
The function is part of the Gnulib: gnu.org/software/gnulib/manual/gnulib.html –  R1tschY Jul 9 '13 at 9:29
    
    
Can you not just put ldd --version? –  Kevdog777 Jan 20 at 15:05

Use -print-file-name gcc option:

$ gcc -print-file-name=libc.so
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.5.1/../../../../lib64/libc.so

That gives the path. Now:

$ file /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.5.1/../../../../lib64/libc.so
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.5.1/../../../../lib64/libc.so: ASCII C program text

$ cat /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.5.1/../../../../lib64/libc.so
/* GNU ld script
   Use the shared library, but some functions are only in
   the static library, so try that secondarily.  */
OUTPUT_FORMAT(elf64-x86-64)
GROUP ( /lib64/libc.so.6 /usr/lib64/libc_nonshared.a  AS_NEEDED ( /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ) )

Looks like a linker script. libc is special on Linux in that it can be executed:

$ /lib64/libc.so.6
GNU C Library stable release version 2.13, by Roland McGrath et al.
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.
There is NO warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Compiled by GNU CC version 4.5.1 20100924 (Red Hat 4.5.1-4).
Compiled on a Linux 2.6.35 system on 2011-08-05.
Available extensions:
    Support for some architectures added on, not maintained in glibc core.
    The C stubs add-on version 2.1.2.
    crypt add-on version 2.1 by Michael Glad and others
    GNU Libidn by Simon Josefsson
    Native POSIX Threads Library by Ulrich Drepper et al
    BIND-8.2.3-T5B
    RT using linux kernel aio
libc ABIs: UNIQUE IFUNC
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/bugs.html>.
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oops, I thought you needed the path, my bad. –  Maxim Egorushkin Mar 14 '12 at 22:23

I doubt if you have more than one glibc installed in your system.But ldd -v <path/to/gcc-4.x> should give you the glibc used.

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even easier

use ldd --version

This should return the glibc version being used i.e.

$ ldd --version

ldd (GNU libc) 2.17
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO

...

which is the same result as running my libc library

$ /lib/libc.so.6 


GNU C Library (GNU libc) stable release version 2.17, by Roland McGrath et al.
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.

...

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Results from above commands are not the same. On my computer : GNU libc version: 2.17, ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (GLIBC_2.3) => /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ?? –  Adam Apr 26 '14 at 9:53

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