Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to be able to interrupt a thread as follows.

void mainThread(char* cmd)
{   
    if (!strcmp(cmd, "start"))
        boost::thread thrd(sender); //start thread

    if (!strcmp(cmd, "stop"))
        thrd.interrupt();       // doesn't work, because thrd is undefined here

}

thrd.interrupt() is not possible because thrd object is undefined when I try to interrupt it. How can I fix this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the move assignment operator:

void mainThread(char* cmd)
{   
    boost::thread thrd;

    if (!strcmp(cmd, "start"))
        thrd = boost::thread(sender); //start thread

    if (!strcmp(cmd, "stop"))
        thrd.interrupt();

}
share|improve this answer

Boost thread is movable, so you can do something like:

boost::thread myThread;
if ( isStart ) {
    myThread = boost::thread(sender);
else if ( isStop ) {
    myThread.interrupt();
}

If you want to pass it around (e.g. as an argument to the function), you'll probably want to use a pointer or a reference:

void
mainThread( std::string const& command, boost::thread& aThread )
{
    if ( command == "start" ) {
        aThread = boost::thread( sender );
    } else if ( command == "stop" ) {
        aThread.interrupt();
    }
}

(This probably needs more. For example, as written, if you execute mainThread( "start" ) twice in a row, you'll detach the first thread, and never be able to refer to it again.)

Another alternative would be to use boost::shared_ptr.

share|improve this answer
1  
In the else if of the first code shouldn't be isStop or something similar instead or isStart?. –  Adri C.S. Dec 18 '12 at 16:47
    
@AdriC.S. Yes. I'll fix it. –  James Kanze Dec 19 '12 at 10:56

This isn't a question about boost::thread, it's about scope:

this:

if(Condition)
    MyType foo;
... // foo is out of scope
foo.method(); // won't work, no foo in scope

is the same as this:

if(Condition) 
{
    MyType foo;
} // after this brace, foo no longer exists, so...
foo.method(); // won't work, no foo in scope

Notice that the answers above all do something like:

MyType foo:
if (Condition)
    foo.method(); // works because now there is a foo in scope
else
{
    foo.otherMethod(); // foo in scope here, too.
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.