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I'm migrating toward node.js 0.6.12 and now got the following error messages when using pg module (version 0.6.14):

Error: This socket is closed.
at Socket._write (net.js:453:28)
at Socket.write (net.js:446:15)
at [object Object]._send (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/connection.js:102:24)
at [object Object].flush (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/connection.js:192:8)
at [object Object].getRows (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/query.js:112:14)
at [object Object].prepare (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/query.js:150:8)
at [object Object].submit (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/query.js:97:10)
at [object Object]._pulseQueryQueue (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/client.js:166:24)
at [object Object].query (/home/luc/node_modules/pg/lib/client.js:193:8)
at /home/luc/test/routes/user.js:23:29

The line indicated in my code is:

var get_obj = client.query("SELECT id FROM users WHERE name = $1", [name]);

This use to work fine with node 0.4.8 and gp 0.5.0 but does not work anymore now I'm testing the migration.

I saw several error like this one on the net but no answer.

UPDATE

This seems to be linked to the way I handle my postgres connection. Today I create a single connection when running the app. I think creating a new connection on each request would be better. Is the best solution to have the connection created in an express middleware ?

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Normally, frameworks and middleware keep the connection open (or: a pool of connections). The problem lies most probably in your node.js code (or usage). BTW: if you have access to the postgres's logfiles, you can probably see explicit disconnections from the node.js. (log_connections and log_disconnections should both be set to True to see this) –  wildplasser Mar 15 '12 at 11:45
    
@wildplasser, in expressjs, I have created a middleware that open a new connection for each request. Not sure this is the best approach but it solved the thing. I'll check around pooling my connection then. –  Luc Mar 15 '12 at 15:03
    
Connect+disconnect is considered an expensive operation (TCP traffic, authorisation, forking a worker process (for postgres) , session setup, logging, (accounting?) ). But if it works for you (or you have only one request+reply for the session) it's okay. –  wildplasser Mar 15 '12 at 15:49
    
@wildplasser, yes I have only one request per session. Thanks for your advices. Could you make your comment an answer ? –  Luc Mar 15 '12 at 23:22
    
And so I did. At your service... –  wildplasser Mar 16 '12 at 11:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally, frameworks and middleware keep the connection open (or: a pool of connections). The problem lies most probably in your node.js code (or usage). BTW: if you have access to the postgres's logfiles, you can probably see explicit disconnections from the node.js. (log_connections and log_disconnections should both be set to True to see this)

Connect+disconnect is considered an expensive operation (TCP traffic, authorisation, forking a worker process (for postgres) , session setup, logging, (accounting?) ). But if it works for you (or you have only one request+reply for the session) it's okay.

Cost /resource usage estimates:

For the session setup:

  • TCP/IP connection setup: 2*2 IP packets := 4*round-trip delay
  • login /password:
    • 2*2 TCP readwrites := 4 * round-trip delays
    • 4 system R/W calls
    • a few database queries / lookups for user authorisation, (say 10...100 disk reads; mostly cached)
    • session construction := fork (for postgres) + lots of COW pages being cloned (? 100-1000 pagefaults?)
  • session initialisation := a few round trips

for the query:

  • send+ receive query := a few TCP/IP round-trips
  • parse := a few (1...100) catalog lookups (mostly from disk cache)
  • execute := xxx disk reads (possibly from cache)
  • fetch and store results := allocate (dirty) buffers
  • send results := xxx TCP round-trips
  • discard result-buffers := (almost for free!)

Session teardown:

  • 3*2 IP roundtrips
  • exit() of the child process, wait() for the parent process (Sorry, I think in unix-terms ;-)
  • 1 socket-descriptor in TIME_WAIT state for a few seconds / minutes

As you can see, the amount of resources spent on connection build-up is 10, maybe 100 times as big as what a typical query+result will cost; if you have more than one query to execute it will be wise to keep the connection open. (or maintain a pool of open connections)

For simplicity, I ignored CPU consumption and mainly ignored memory/buffer usage. Nowadays, CPU almost seems for free; the amount of calculation that can be done while waiting for a disk (10 ms) or network (x ms) is incredible: several (100...10K?) ticks per byte.

share|improve this answer
    
great details, thanks. I use a db connection per http request, keeping the same db connection if several call to the db are necessary to process the request. This is working really fine though. Thanks a lot. –  Luc Mar 16 '12 at 13:51

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