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I have a function that calculates the number of tickets a user chooses (from a dropdown list) and multiplies it by the price of the ticket (this ticket price is stored on my sql database).

The function itself works fine:

function quantityChange(selElem) {
//Select the value of the drop down list       
var quantity = $('#showQuantity option:selected').val();
//get the value of the number from the tPrice column in 'ticket' table
var ticket = parseInt(document.getElementById('ticketPriceHidden').value);
//get the venue value
var venue = document.getElementById('venuePlaceHidden').value;
//multiply them together
var total = quantity * ticket;

document.getElementById('summary').innerHTML= 'You have chosen'+ ' ' + quantity + ' ' + 'tickets @' + ' ' + venue + ' = ' + ' ' + ' £' + total;
}

This function is called in a div called 'ticket', once the user sees the calculated total from this function and then they press a 'continue' button that hides this div and shows a new div called 'delivery' so the result is not being discarded.

What I'm trying to do is this: I want to get the result of the function quantityChange(selElem) again but in a completely new div called 'summary'. Is there any way of doing this?

Any help is much appreciated, thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Write the function more abstract with a return value instead. Call another function using this value to set it to the summary. Done. –  Smamatti Mar 14 '12 at 16:25
1  
That's an interesting mix of jQuery and plain DOM methods. What are you using selElem for? Instead of hardcoding the element ID into the function, make it a parameter. Or to be even more flexible with the computed values, return the result. –  Felix Kling Mar 14 '12 at 16:26
    
Thank you both for your quick responses. @Felix King, I'm still a bit of a noob with the syntax for passing the parameters and what I should be returning. Please could you be so kind to digress further what I need to code to make this function more flexible? –  Tim Johnstone Mar 14 '12 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

One option is to pass the ID of the element you want the text appear in as parameter to the function:

function quantityChange(elementId) {
    //Select the value of the drop down list       
    var quantity = $('#showQuantity option:selected').val();
    //get the value of the number from the tPrice column in 'ticket' table
    var ticket = +$('#ticketPriceHidden').val();
    //get the venue value
    var venue = $('#venuePlaceHidden').val();
    //multiply them together
    var total = quantity * ticket;

    $('#' + elementId').html('You have chosen'+ ' ' + quantity + ' ' + 'tickets @' + ' ' + venue + ' = ' + ' ' + ' £' + total);
}

which you call as:

quantityChange('summary');

To achieve even more flexibility, you can return all the computed values:

function quantityChange() {
    //Select the value of the drop down list       
    var quantity = $('#showQuantity option:selected').val();
    //get the value of the number from the tPrice column in 'ticket' table
    var ticket = +$('#ticketPriceHidden').val();
    //get the venue value
    var venue = $('#venuePlaceHidden').val();
    //multiply them together
    var total = quantity * ticket;

    return {
        venue: venue,
        quantity: quantity,
        ticket: ticket,
        total: total
    };
}

and create the output in the calling function:

var data = quantityChange();

$('#summary').text('You have to pay ' + data.total + ' something');

This way, the actual output (how you want to present the data), is not hardcoded in the function which computes the values.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply! this is fantastic :) one question though, when you say 'create the output in the calling function' and show the code...is this var data = quantityChange() a new function? –  Tim Johnstone Mar 14 '12 at 17:13
    
It's not a function, but it can be in a function. Just somewhere else in your code, e.g. as a response to a button click. –  Felix Kling Mar 14 '12 at 17:15
    
When I implement what you have suggested, I get an error from the console saying: document.getElementById('ticketPriceHidden') is null :/ –  Tim Johnstone Mar 14 '12 at 17:18
1  
That means it cannot find that element. But you had document.getElementById('ticketPriceHidden') in your code as well, so there is not much of a difference. –  Felix Kling Mar 14 '12 at 17:20

Make it a generic function that returns a value, instead.

function foo()
{
var a = 0;
var b = 1;
return a+b;
}

document.getElementById("bar").innerHTML = "Your returned amount is " + foo();

bar's innerHTML would read

Your returned amount is 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. –  Tim Johnstone Mar 14 '12 at 18:51

These lines should help you.

The first line creates a div.

The second line inserts your function result in that div.

The third line hangs the div on an element you've given the id "xxx".

var div = document.createElement("div");
div.innerHTML = functionResult;
document.getElementById("xxx").appendChild(div);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. –  Tim Johnstone Mar 14 '12 at 18:50

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