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I am trying to replace the $3 column values of the input file if $3 is > 100. I tried:

awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t"} {if($3 > 100) $3=$3/100;print}' test.stat

This outputs the correct changes to the stdout but, I need the change to write to the input file (test.stat) such that, the values of the remaining fields/records remain unchanged. Any suggestion?

Thanks. Another issue has arisen. I have a "counter" variable whose sum needs to be printed in the END block, I tried:

awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t",counter=0} 
{if($3 > 100) $3=$3/100;print else counter++}
END{print counter}' test.stat > ...

Now, only the counter value gets written to the file and not the $3 values. How can I separate the two outputs so one modifies the file and the other saved as bash variable using read command. Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Awk isn't designed to edit things in-place. It's designed to process data and write it to stdout (or another file). You can do something like this:

awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t"} {if($3 > 100) $3=$3/100;print}' test.stat > test.stat.new && mv test.stat test.stat.old && mv test.stat.new test.stat

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Thanks, wasn't aware of AWK's restriction –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 16:49
    
but, it does not preserve the formatting, i.e., my input fields are separated by tabs but, the edited record has the fields separated by space. Also, how to limit the float to 2 d.p before printing. thanks –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 16:56
    
figured out. thanks –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 17:01
1  
where will the redirection be placed if I also have an END clause that prints a counter that was initialized in the BEGIN? Thanks. –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 18:32
    
It will go to the same place - stdout. –  Andrew Beals Mar 14 '12 at 18:41

As far as I know awk doesn't have in-place editing as sed does (via the -i switch).

The easy solution, of course, is to use a temp file and overwrite the original file afterwards. This is the solution recommended even in comp.lang.awk.

The harder solution is to save the changes to an awk array and add an END block that dumps the contents of the array to the original file.

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To make your command more awk-like:

awk -F '\t' '$3 > 100 {$3 = $3/100} {print}' test.stat

To overwrite the file, you need to write to a temp file

f=$(mktemp)
cp test.stat test.stat.bak$(date +%s)  ;# if you want a backup copy
awk '...' test.stat > "$f" && mv "$f" test.stat
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awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t"} {if($3 > 100) $3=$3/100;print}' test.stat > /tmp/tmp.stat && mv /tmp/tmp.stat test.stat

this should work

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Thanks. but, it does not preserve the formatting, i.e., my input fields are separated by tabs but, the edited record has the fields separated by space. Also, how to limit the float to 2 d.p before printing. thanks –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 16:49
    
figured out. thanks –  Shuvo Shams Mar 14 '12 at 17:01
    
@shuvo-shams - output separator is space by default, can be changed via OFS, e. g. awk 'BEGIN {FS="\t"; OFS="\t"} { ... } –  citrin Feb 20 '13 at 15:07

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