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Long story short: pythonw.exe does nothing, python.exe accepts nothing (which one should I use?)

test.py:

print "a"

CMD window:

C:\path>pythonw.exe test.py
<BLANK LINE>
C:\path>

C:\path>python.exe test.py
  File "C:\path\test.py", line 7
    print "a"
            ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

C:\path>

Please tell me what I'm doing terrible wrong.

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up vote 70 down vote accepted

If you don't want a terminal window to pop up when you run your program use pythonw.exe;
Otherwise, use python.exe

Regarding the syntax error: print is now a function in 3.x
So use instead:

print("a")
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To summarize and complement the existing answers:

  • python.exe is a console (terminal) application for launching CLI-type scripts.

    • Unless run from an existing console window, python.exe opens a new console window.
    • Standard streams sys.stdin, sys.stdout and sys.stderr are connected to the console window.
    • Execution is synchronous:
      • If a new console window was created, it stays open until the script terminates.
      • When invoked from an existing console window, the prompt is blocked until the script terminates.
  • pythonw.exe is a GUI app for launching GUI/no-UI-at-all scripts.

    • NO console window is opened.
    • Execution is asynchronous:
      • When invoked from a console window, the script is merely launched and the prompt returns right away, whether the script is still running or not.
    • Standard streams sys.stdin, sys.stdout and sys.stderr are NOT available.
      • Caution: Unless you take extra steps, this has potentially unexpected side effects:
        • Unhandled exceptions cause the script to abort silently.
        • In Python 2.x, simply trying to use print() can cause that to happen.
        • To prevent that, and to learn more, see this answer.

You can control which of the executables runs your script by default - such as when opened from Explorer - by choosing the right filename extension:

  • *.py files are by default associated (invoked) with python.exe
  • *.pyw files are by default associated (invoked) with pythonw.exe
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1  
IMHO, the best answer. – wap26 Sep 21 '15 at 14:55

See here: http://docs.python.org/using/windows.html

pythonw.exe "This suppresses the terminal window on startup."

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6  
pythonw.exe has side effects that your program may fail silenty if it writes to stdout/stderr stream - see bugs.python.org/issue706263 – techtonik Jun 26 '13 at 10:38

If you're going to call a python script from some other process (say, from the command line), use pythonw.exe. Otherwise, your user will continuously see a cmd window launching the python process. It'll still run your script just the same, but it won't intrude on the user experience.

An example might be sending an email; python.exe will pop up a CLI window, send the email, then close the window. It'll appear as a quick flash, and can be considered somewhat annoying. pythonw.exe avoids this, but still sends the email.

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1  
True, but re "say, from the command line": If you already are in a console (terminal) window, then python.exe will not open another one. – mklement0 May 18 '15 at 14:19

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