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As an example my list is:

[25.75443, 26.7803, 25.79099, 24.17642, 24.3526, 22.79056, 20.84866, 19.49222, 18.38086, 18.0358, 16.57819, 15.71255, 14.79059, 13.64154, 13.09409, 12.18347, 11.33447, 10.32184, 9.544922, 8.813385, 8.181152, 6.983734, 6.048035, 5.505096, 4.65799]

and I'm looking for the index of the value closest to 11.5. I've tried other methods such as binary search and bisect_left but they don't work.

I cannot sort this array, because the index of the value will be used on a similar array to fetch the value at that index.

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5 Answers 5

Try the following:

min(range(len(a)), key=lambda i: abs(a[i]-11.5))

For example:

>>> a = [25.75443, 26.7803, 25.79099, 24.17642, 24.3526, 22.79056, 20.84866, 19.49222, 18.38086, 18.0358, 16.57819, 15.71255, 14.79059, 13.64154, 13.09409, 12.18347, 11.33447, 10.32184, 9.544922, 8.813385, 8.181152, 6.983734, 6.048035, 5.505096, 4.65799]
>>> min(range(len(a)), key=lambda i: abs(a[i]-11.5))
16

Or to get the index and the value:

>>> min(enumerate(a), key=lambda x: abs(x[1]-11.5))
(16, 11.33447)
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7  
+1. Today I learned that min/max take a key parameter. –  kindall Mar 14 '12 at 17:24

Going trough all the items is only linear. If you would sort the array that would be worse.

I dont see a problem on keeping an additional deltax(the min difference so far) and idx(the index of that element) and just loop once trough the list.

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How about: you zip the two lists, then sort the result?

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If you can't sort the array, then there is no quick way to find the closest item - you have to iterate over all entries.

There is a workaround but it's quite a bit of work: Write a sort algorithm which sorts the array and (at the same time) updates a second array which tells you where this entry was before the array was sorted.

That way, you can use binary search to look up index of the closest entry and then use this index to look up the original index using the "index array".

[EDIT] Using zip(), this is pretty simple to achieve:

 array_to_sort = zip( original_array, range(len(original_array)) )
 array_to_sort.sort( key=i:i[0] )

Now you can binary search for the value (using item[0]). item[1] will give you the original index.

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Keep in mind that if space isn't important you can sort any list without moving the contents by creating a secondary list of the sorted indices.

Also bear in mind that if you are doing this look up just once, then you will just have to traverse every element in the list O(n). (If multiple times then you probably would want to sort for increase efficiency later)

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