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I'm designing a RESTful web service and am attempting to make proper use of hypermedia to establish relationships between resources. For some resources, the client needs to be able to assign a relationship to another resource, however it seems to me that requiring the client to generate a hyperlink and POST/PUT/PATCH/whatever this hyperlink into a resource has some drawbacks (more complexity for the client, security and load balancing concerns, etc.). I'm thinking that having the client send a simple ID and having the server generate the URL would be better.

Here are some completely contrived resources for a piano rental API to demonstrate my thinking.

GET http://company.com:9999/customers/42
{
    "id"        : 42,
    "name"      : "George P. Burdell",
    "phone"     : "555-555-5555",
    "piano"     : { "href" : "http://company.com:9999/pianos/101"}
}

GET http://company.com:9999/pianos/101
{
    "id"        : 101,
    "make"      : "Steinway",
    "model"     : "Model D"
}

Suppose a customer wants to rent a different piano.

The client sends a partial update such as:

PATCH http://company.com:9999/customers/42
{ "piano" : 202}

The server would then generate a proper url to the new piano resource and update accordingly:

GET http://company.com:9999/customers/42
{
    "id"        : ...,
    "name"      : ...,
    "phone"     : ...,
    "piano"     : { "href" : "http://company.com:9999/pianos/202"}
}

Edit: As I see it, clients directly updating hyperlinks can be problematic. Is this a RESTfully good solution, or is there a better one? Is this not even a problem at all? Also, real world examples of clients updating resource hyperlinks in some way would be great-- I haven't found any.

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I like the idea, it is clean and elegant and works as long as all entities resides within the same REST webservice... as with all APIs (not only RESTful ones) a proper documentation is mandatory... what I am not sire about: what is exactly your question/goal ? –  Yahia Mar 14 '12 at 16:44
    
Thanks, good point. Clients directly updating hyperlinks seems problematic, and I'm looking for a clean solution or someone to explain to me why it's really not a problem. As I started to type the question, the solution above came to me I decided to throw it out there for comment. –  HolySamosa Mar 14 '12 at 16:59
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1 Answer 1

Your response are missing the links and forms required by the HATEOAS contraint of RESTful systems. For instance, if a customer wants to rent a different piano, then you can add a "rent" form on the piano response. For instance

GET http://company.com:9999/pianos/101
{
    "self"      : "http://company.com:9999/pianos/101",
    "id"        : 101,
    "make"      : "Steinway",
    "model"     : "Model D",
    "rent"      : {
        "href"      : "http://company.com:9999/pianos/101",
        "method"    : "post"
        // you can add form parameters like from and to dates here
    }
}

IMO this should create a "rental" resource, which would provide the many-to-many relationship between a piano and a customer. Then to allow customer to cancel a rental you can have a delete form on the rental agreement.

Here are a couple of good articles covering this:

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