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How would I get the first letter of each word for a given string?

$string = "Community College District";
$result = "CCD";

I found the javascript method but wasn't sure how to convert it to php.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you want to know how to get the first letter of your string, as per how your question is phrased or how to get the first letter of each word, as per your example? If the former: $result = $string[0]. – Anonymous Mar 14 '12 at 16:57
1  
first letter of each word – Grigor Mar 14 '12 at 16:58
    
You're positive that each word is separated by a single space? What__about__this__sentence? or What about.This sentence? – Mike B Mar 14 '12 at 16:59
8  
What have you tried so far? – DaveRandom Apr 23 '13 at 8:31
1  
explode the string at white spaces then loop through the result array and because each one is a string you can use $string[0] to get the first character then simply concatenate those. – slash197 Apr 23 '13 at 8:33

19 Answers 19

up vote 48 down vote accepted

explode() on the spaces, then you use the [] notation to access the resultant strings as arrays:

$words = explode(" ", "Community College District");
$acronym = "";

foreach ($words as $w) {
  $acronym .= $w[0];
}

If you have an expectation that multiple spaces may separate words, switch instead to preg_split()

$words = preg_split("/\s+/", "Community College District");

Or if characters other than whitespace delimit words (-,_) for example, use preg_split() as well:

// Delimit by multiple spaces, hyphen, underscore, comma
$words = preg_split("/[\s,_-]+/", "Community College District");
share|improve this answer
1  
To the point: preg_match_all("/[A-Z]/", ucwords(strtolower($string)), $matches); – dmmd Jun 30 '14 at 20:11

The best way to accomplish this is with regular expressions.

Lets break down what you want in a logical way: You want every character from the string is at the beginning of a word. The best way to identify those characters is to look for those characters that are preceded by white space.

So we start with a lookbehind for that space character, followed by any character:

/(?<=\s)./

This will find any character preceded by a space. But - the first character in the string is a character in the string is one you want extract. And because it's the first character in the string, it can't be preceded by a space. So we want to match anything preceded by a space or the first character in the string, so we add a start-of-subject assertion:

/(?<=\s|^)./

Now we are getting closer. But what if the string contains blocks of multiple spaces? What if it contains a space followed by a punctuation character? We probably don't want to match any of those, in fat we probably just want to match letters. We can do that with a character class [a-zA-Z]. And we can make are expression case-insensitive using the i modifier.

So we end up with:

/(?<=\s|^)[a-z]/i

But how do we actually use this in PHP? Well we want to match all occurrences of the regular expression within the string so we use (you guessed it) preg_match_all():

$string = "Progress in Veterinary Science";

$expr = '/(?<=\s|^)[a-z]/i';
preg_match_all($expr, $string, $matches);

Now we have all the characters we wanted to extract. To construct the result string you show, we need to join them together again:

$result = implode('', $matches[0]);

...and we need to ensure that they are all upper-case:

$result = strtoupper($result);

And that's really all there is to it.

See it working

share|improve this answer
1  
If you wanted you could also use (?<=\b) instead of (?<=\s|^), this would allow you to capture the initial letters of words separated by hyphens, full stops, etc. (basically "non word" characters, those that would not match \w or \W), but could also end up capturing things you don't want. – Leigh Apr 23 '13 at 9:38
    
Your solution helped a lot! Thank you ! – yathrakaaran Apr 7 at 0:02

Assuming the words are all split by spaces, this is a suitable solution:

$string = "Progress in Veterinary Science";

function initials($str) {
    $ret = '';
    foreach (explode(' ', $str) as $word)
        $ret .= strtoupper($word[0]);
    return $ret;
}

echo initials($string); // would output "PIVS"
share|improve this answer
    
I think $word[0] is faster than substr($word,0,1) so why do you use substr($word,0,1)? – Sir l33tname Apr 23 '13 at 8:37
1  
I'm just not very trusting of strings as arrays. I've had some errors pop up in the past – casraf Apr 23 '13 at 8:40
1  
Care to show us what kind of errors for our own reference? – LeonardChallis May 28 '13 at 11:35
    
Edit: TL;DR: just old habits – casraf May 28 '13 at 12:06
1  
@LeonardChallis I don't know, if Chen Asraf was reffering to this kind of errors, but using substr($word,0,1) (or actually -- mb_substr($word, 0, 1, 'utf-8')) is an absolute must, if you're operating on multi-byte strings. Using simple $word[0] will chop multi-byte character half and give you incorrect initial -- some strange symbol instead of actual letter. If you refer this situation as an error, then there you have your answer! :] – trejder Aug 25 '14 at 9:13

Like this

preg_match_all('#(?<=\s|\b)\pL#u', $String, $Result);
echo '<pre>' . print_r($Result, 1) . '</pre>';
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I got problem with first letter in my code. What character indicates first letter? <= ? – Narek Apr 23 '13 at 8:51
1  
+1 for \pL. Could you add a little explanation though? I prefer to teach a man to fish rather than just giving him one ;-) – DaveRandom Apr 23 '13 at 9:07
    
@Narek (?<=) this is Positive Lookbehind this detail – Winston Apr 23 '13 at 9:09
    
@DaveRandom here datail about this chars – Winston Apr 23 '13 at 9:10
    
@Winston I know (although I took the KISS approach in my answer), I meant more for the OP ;-) but thanks anyway :-) – DaveRandom Apr 23 '13 at 9:12

Michael Berkowski's (and others) answer, simplified to one line and working correctly on multi-byte characters (i.e. making abbreviation / initials out of non-Latin string):

foreach(explode(' ', $words) as $word) $acronym .= mb_substr($word, 0, 1, 'utf-8');

Using mb_substr($word, 0, 1, 'utf-8'), instead of $word[0] seems to be must, if you're working on non-Latin, multi-byte strings and characters, i.e. when using UTF-8 encoded strings.

share|improve this answer
$temp = explode(' ', $string);
$result = '';
foreach($temp as $t)
    $result .= $t[0];
share|improve this answer

There are a lot of explode answers. I think using the strtok function is a much more elegant and memory-efficient solution:

function createAcronym($string) {
    $output = null;
    $token  = strtok($string, ' ');
    while ($token !== false) {
        $output .= $token[0];
        $token = strtok(' ');
    }
    return $output;
}
$string = 'Progress in Veterinary Science';
echo createAcronym($string, false);

Here is a more robust and useful function, which supports UTF8 characters and the option to only use the capitalized words:

function createAcronym($string, $onlyCapitals = false) {
    $output = null;
    $token  = strtok($string, ' ');
    while ($token !== false) {
        $character = mb_substr($token, 0, 1);
        if ($onlyCapitals and mb_strtoupper($character) !== $character) {
            $token = strtok(' ');
            continue;
        }
        $output .= $character;
        $token = strtok(' ');
    }
    return $output;
}
$string = 'Leiðari í Kliniskum Útbúgvingum';
echo createAcronym($string);
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree, your code is massive compared to the explode methods. – Dale Apr 23 '13 at 9:10
1  
@Dale Well, that tells us more about you than about my code -- aesthetics are a poor way of assessing code. Using explode to solve this problem is what would be called a naïve solution. It is like using the bubble-sort algorithm just because it is easy to implement. – Sverri M. Olsen Apr 23 '13 at 9:31
    
@MAssiveAmountsOfCode I disagree why do something in 13 lines of code, that can be achieved in 1 foreach(explode(' ', $string) as $word) echo $word[0]; ? Easier to understand at a glance, and not a time waster. – Dale Apr 23 '13 at 9:34
    
Also what is naive about splitting a string of words separated by a space, by a space? I think your remark tells us that you're a pompous coder that isn't open to code reviews. – Dale Apr 23 '13 at 9:37
1  
@Dale I did not mean to insult you, or to appear pompous. It is naïve because exploding a string creates an array, where one is not needed. Tokenizing the string is more elegant because you are stepping through the original string, which requires less memory. I am not saying that using explode is wrong (it gets the job done), but that there is a more elegant say of solving the problem. And I am not using the word "elegant" in an aesthetic way, I am using it in a technical way. – Sverri M. Olsen Apr 23 '13 at 9:56
function acronym( $string = '' ) {
    $words = explode(' ', $string);
    if ( ! $words ) {
        return false;
    }
    $result = '';
    foreach ( $words as $word ) $result .= $word[0];
    return strtoupper( $result );
}
share|improve this answer

I think you have to explode and join them back again .....

<?php
$string  = "Progress in Veterinary Science";
$pieces = explode(" ", $string);
$str="";
foreach($pieces as $piece)
{
    $str.=$piece[0];
}    
echo $str; /// it will result into  "PiVS"
?>
share|improve this answer

Try this-

$strs=explode(" ",$string);

foreach($strs as $str)
  echo $str[0];
share|improve this answer

Something like this should do the trick :

$string = 'Some words in a string';
$words = explode(' ', $string); // array of word
foreach($words as $word){
    echo $word[0]; // first letter
}
share|improve this answer
$str = 'I am a String!';
echo implode('', array_map(function($v) { return $v[0]; }, explode(' ', $str)));

// would output IaaS
share|improve this answer

Using Prateeks foundation, here's a simple example with explanations

//  initialize variables
$string = 'Capitalize Each First Word In A String';
$myCapitalizedString = '';

//  here's the code
$strs=explode(" ",$string);    
foreach($strs as $str) {
  $myCapitalizedString .= $str[0]; 
}

//  output
echo $myCapitalizedString;  // prints 'CEFWIAS'
share|improve this answer
    
This is my first solution posted to this site. HTH! – ereginator Jun 2 '13 at 8:30

For the case that you'll be doing this on large strings (or even directly from file) explode() isn't the best way to do this. Imagine how much memory will get wasted if you have to split string 2MB large into memory.

With little more coding and (assuming PHP >= 5.0) you can easily implement PHP's Iterator class that will do exactly this. This will be close to generator in python and long story short, here's the code:

/**
 * Class for CONTINOUS reading of words from string.
*/
class WordsIterator implements Iterator {
    private $pos = 0;
    private $str = '';
    private $index = 0;
    private $current = null;

    // Regexp explained:
    // ([^\\w]*?) - Eat everything non-word before actual word characters
    //              Mostly used only if string beings with non-word char
    // ([\\w]+)   - Word
    // ([^\\w]+?|$) - Trailing thrash
    private $re = '~([^\\w]*?)([\\w]+)([^\\w]+?|$)~imsS';

    // Primary initialize string
    public function __construct($str) {
        $this->str = $str;
    }

    // Restart indexing
    function rewind() {
        $this->pos = 0;
        $this->index = 0;
        $this->current = null;
    }

    // Fetches current word
    function current() {
        return $this->current;
    }

    // Return id of word you are currently at (you can use offset too)
    function key() {
        return $this->index;
    }

    // Here's where the magic is done
    function next() {
        if( $this->pos < 0){
            return;
        }

        $match = array();
        ++$this->index;

        // If we can't find any another piece that matches... Set pos to -1
        // and stop function
        if( !preg_match( $this->re, $this->str, $match, 0, $this->pos)){
            $this->current = null;
            $this->pos = -1;
            return;
        }

        // Skip what we have read now
        $this->current = $match[2];
        $this->pos += strlen( $match[1]) + strlen( $match[2]) + strlen($match[3]);

        // We're trying to iterate past string
        if( $this->pos >= strlen($this->str)){
            $this->pos = -1;
        }

    }

    // Okay, we're done? :)
    function valid() {
        return ($this->pos > -1);
    }
}

And if you'll use it on a bit more challenging string:

$a = new WordsIterator("Progress in Veterinary Science. And, make it !more! interesting!\nWith new line.");
foreach( $a as $i){
    echo $i;
    echo "\n";
}

Will you get the expected result:

Progress
in
Veterinary
Science
And
make
it
more
interesting
With
new
line

So you can easily use $i[0] to fetch first letter.You probably can see that this is more effective solution than splitting whole string into memory (always use only as little memory as possible). You also could easily modify this solution to work with continuous reading of files etc.

share|improve this answer
<?php $arr = explode(" ",$String);

foreach($arr as $s)
{
   echo substr($s,0,1);
}

?>

firstly I explode string by spaces then I substr first char.

http://php.net/substr

http://php.net/explode

share|improve this answer

Try This

function initials($string) {
        if(!(empty($string))) {
            if(strpos($string, " ")) {
                $string = explode(" ", $string);
                $count = count($string);
                $new_string = '';
                for($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
                $first_letter = substr(ucwords($string[$i]), 0, 1);
                $new_string .= $first_letter;
            }
            return $new_string;
            } else {
                $first_letter = substr(ucwords($string), 0, 1);
                $string = $first_letter;
                return $string;
            }
        } else {
            return "empty string!";
        }
    }
    echo initials('Thomas Edison');
share|improve this answer

Something I've cooked up.

/**
 * Return the first letter of each word in uppercase - if it's to long.
 *
 * @param string $str
 * @param int $max
 * @param string $acronym
 * @return string
 */
function str_acronym($str, $max = 12, $acronym = '')
{
    if (strlen($str) <= $max) return $str;

    $words = explode(' ', $str);

    foreach ($words as $word)
    {
        $acronym .= strtoupper(substr($word, 0, 1));
    }

    return $acronym;
}
share|improve this answer

I like Reg Expression over any other method of string extraction, but if you are unfamiliar with Reg Ex then hear is a method using the explode() PHP function:

$string = "David Beckham";
$string_split = explode(" ", $string);
$inititals = $string_split[0][0] . $string_split[1][0];
echo $inititals;

Obviously the above code will only work on a name containing two words.

share|improve this answer

If there are more number of spaces between two letters in the input string then try this.

function first_letter($str)
{
    $arr2 = array_filter(array_map('trim',explode(' ', $str)));
    $result='';
    foreach($arr2 as $v)
    {
        $result.=$v[0];
    }
    return $result;
}

$str="    Let's   try   with    more   spaces       for  fun .   ";

echo first_letter($str);

Demo1

Alternative of same code

function first_letter($str)
{
    return implode('', array_map(function($v) { return $v[0]; },array_filter(array_map('trim',explode(' ', $str)))));;
}

$str="    Let's   try   with    more   spaces       for  fun .   ";

echo first_letter($str);

Demo2

share|improve this answer

protected by rene Oct 12 '15 at 18:42

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