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I am developing a simple data to XML serializer for training purposes. Now that I have my base class of a serializer done, I want to derive a specialized serializer for the data structures of different projects. My base serializer has functions like this:

class Serializer {
public:
    template <class T> void add_value(const std::string &key, T *value);
    template <class T> void add_value(const std::string &key, std::vector<T*> *value);
};

The base serializer is able to handle most primitive data structures (int, double, bool, etc.) and there are some overloads for a few more complex structures (vectors, maps, etc.). Lets assume I now have a project with the following data structure:

struct MyStruct {
    int width, height;
};

I would now like to derive a serializer from my base serializer that is able to handle that structure, as well as the structures it already knows:

class MyStructSerializer : public Serializer {
    void add_value(const std::string &key, MyStruct *value);
};

Problem is: After overloading the add_value function in the child class, the parent class forms of it are no longer available. Is it possible to overload the add_value function as a specialization to the functions provided in the parent class, i.e. keep the child class from forgetting the more general method of its parent after overloading?

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1  
I already don't like your code. Why are you taking mutable values by pointer, and why would anyone have a vector of pointers? –  Mooing Duck Mar 14 '12 at 17:16
    
You might want to reconsider the approach. While it is simple to answer your question (add a using declaration in the derived type) this is probably not a good design in C++. Adding any new type to your system would require that you create a new serializer type, and either you force a linear hierarchy or you will have problems if you need to serialize two of your user defined types. Inheritance is one of the most abused constructs, and this is one such case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 14 '12 at 17:21
    
@Mooing Duck For two reasons: First of all I want to serialize gSOAP generated structures, and gSOAP is using these pointer structures; and furthermore using pointer structures allows me using the nullpointer as a value is not specified default regardless of the type. –  nijansen Mar 14 '12 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The using keyword will import members of the base class into the derived class:

include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
// Note: __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ is non-standard
#define X(x) (std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << "\n")
class Serializer {
public:
  template <class T> void add_value(const std::string &key, T *value)
    { X(); }
  template <class T> void add_value(const std::string &key, std::vector<T*> *value)
    { X(); }
};

struct MyStruct {
    int width, height;
};

class MyStructSerializer : public Serializer {
public:
    using Serializer::add_value;
    void add_value(const std::string &key, MyStruct *value)
      { X(); }
};

int main () {
  MyStructSerializer s;
  MyStruct ms;
  int i;
  s.add_value("Hello", &i);
  s.add_value("Hello", &ms);
}

Although, wouldn't it be easier to specialize Serializer::add_value, rather than derive from Serializer? Like this:

template <>
void Serializer::add_value<MyStruct>(const std::string &key, MyStruct* value)
{

}
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Thanks for the solution and your remark - in my first approach I used specialized templates, but I ran into problems with structures that are, itself, templates. –  nijansen Mar 14 '12 at 17:57

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