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I have added a bounty to this as I have, as yet been able to figure this out and time is out.


The below stored procedure will not allow me to add it to Modify it. When attempting to modify it I get the following error -->

Msg 213, Level 16, State 1, Procedure spPersonRelationshipAddOpposing, Line 51 Insert Error: Column name or number of supplied values does not match table definition.

Also, Since the DB was set up for Merge Rep (a rowguid column has been added) this stored procedure now no longer works properly.

Do I need to chang the way the columns are listed? One of the warnings when setting up Merge Rep was this -->

Adding Guid Column MAY Cause INSERT Statements without column lists to Fail

What does that mean? Ideas on how I fix this?

USE [Connect]
GO
/****** Object:  StoredProcedure [dbo].[spPersonRelationshipAddOpposing]    Script Date: 07/15/2009 08:14:35 ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[spPersonRelationshipAddOpposing]
@ExistingRelationshipID INT 
AS
BEGIN
--Declare local variables
DECLARE @PersonID INT  --PersonID of established relarionship
DECLARE @RelatedID INT  --RelatedID of established relarionship
DECLARE @Relationship VARCHAR(4)  --Established relarionship
DECLARE @RelatedSex as VARCHAR(1)  
DECLARE @OpposingRelationship VARCHAR(4)
DECLARE @OpposingRelationshipID INT
--Fill variables from existing relationship
SELECT @PersonID = PersonID, @RelatedID = RelatedID, @Relationship=PersonRelationshipTypeID
FROM tblPersonRelationship where PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID
--Get gender of relative for finding opposing relationship type
SELECT @RelatedSex = (SELECT Gender FROM tblPerson WHERE PersonID = @PersonID)
--get opposing relationship types
IF (@RelatedSex='M')
    BEGIN
    SELECT @OpposingRelationship = (SELECT OpposingMaleRelationship 
                                    From tblAdminPersonRelationshipType 
                                    WHERE PersonRelationshipTypeID = @Relationship)
    END
ELSE IF (@RelatedSex='F')
    BEGIN
    SELECT @OpposingRelationship = (SELECT OpposingFemaleRelationship 
                                    From tblAdminPersonRelationshipType 
                                    WHERE PersonRelationshipTypeID = @Relationship)
    END
--check for existing opposing relationship
SELECT @OpposingRelationshipID = (SELECT MAX(PersonRelationshipID) FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonID = @RelatedID AND RelatedID = @PersonID)
--if an opposing relationship was found

IF (@OpposingRelationship IS NOT NULL)
    BEGIN
--if there is a relationship, update it
    IF ISNUMERIC(@OpposingRelationshipID)=1 
        BEGIN
            UPDATE tblPersonRelationship
            SET PersonRelationshipTypeID = @OpposingRelationship,
                MarriageDate = (SELECT MarriageDate FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID),
                ResidesWithPersonFlag = (SELECT ResidesWithPersonFlag FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID),
                UpdateDateTime = (SELECT UpdateDateTime FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID),
                UpdateProgram = (SELECT UpdateProgram FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID),
                UpdateUserID = (SELECT UpdateUserID FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID) 
            WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @OpposingRelationshipID
        END
--otherwise add record
    ELSE IF (@OpposingRelationship IS NOT NULL)
        BEGIN
            INSERT INTO tblPersonRelationship 
                SELECT @RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID,
                       MarriageDate, NULL, NULL, 
                       ResidesWithPersonFlag, NULL, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram,
                       UpdateUserID, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram, 
                       UpdateUserID, NULL FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID
        END
    END
END
share|improve this question
    
Are you getting an error when you try to replicate it? Is it just not showing up? –  Tom H. Jun 9 '09 at 15:34
    
Sorry, after your comment I realized how crappy of a question this was and I reworded it. Is this better? –  Refracted Paladin Jun 9 '09 at 15:51
    
This question has been reworked to try and attack this from a different angle. I appologize to the two below posters as this makes there posts irrelevant but this was neccessary as they had not answered my question and even with a bounty no one else was trying. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 13:32

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+200

You should always specify explicitly the list of columns when doing the INSERT. Rewrite your code like this:

INSERT INTO tblPersonRelationship (RelatedID, PersonRelationshipID, PersonID, ...)
SELECT @RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID, ...

A guid column was implicitly added to support merge replication, that's why you got the error about column lists mismatch.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you explicitly list columns with Default values as well? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 14:59
4  
No, you don't have to explicitly list columns that have Default values, as SQL will default them to a value. Make sure you're not listing an IDENTITY column that has auto-increment on, however. –  Ryan A Jul 15 '09 at 15:24
1  
You do not need to list columns with default values unless you are adding a value for that column. –  Diago Jul 15 '09 at 15:28
1  
I think you can just use SET @newPlanID = scope_identity() –  Ryan A Jul 15 '09 at 16:08
1  
Or SELECT @newPlanID = scope_identity() –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 15 '09 at 16:20

This error message (Insert Error: Column name or number of supplied values does not match table definition) appears during an INSERT operation when either the number of supplied column names or the number of supplied values does not match the table definition.

I think you are dealing with the latter -- the number of supplied values does not match the table definition. That's my hunch based on the fact that you noted a rowguid column has been added to one of your tables.

Let's take your insert into tblPersonRelationship, for example. Based on the SELECT, one should assume tblPersonRelationship has 15 non-defaulted columns. If you added a rowguid column, it now needs to be represented in the SELECT in the proper position.

INSERT INTO tblPersonRelationship                 
SELECT 
@RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID,                       
MarriageDate, NULL, NULL,                        
ResidesWithPersonFlag, NULL, UpdateDateTime, 
UpdateProgram, UpdateUserID, UpdateDateTime, 
UpdateProgram, UpdateUserID, NULL,
newid()  
FROM tblPersonRelationship 
WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID

You may also get this error when dealing with computed columns. I don't believe this to be your issue, but you may find more here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I tried adding the keyword DEFAULT where you put GUID VALUE but I get an Incorrect Syntax error there now. I looked at some other SProcs and they have DEFAULT listed for the rowguid value so I am confused as to what I am doing wrong. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 14:20
1  
Perhaps I wasn't clear in my answer. You don't need to worry about defaults necessarily. If you simply need a GUID to be generated, use newid(). I've updated the query as well. –  Ben Griswold Jul 15 '09 at 14:34
    
No, I thought you were being clear. I needed to provide a value for all columns. My confusion, I think, has to do with the fact that in a Sister Query on the same DB the value given for rowguid is DEFAULT. Using newid() works though so thank you. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 14:41
    
It worked! Great. I'm happy to help. –  Ben Griswold Jul 15 '09 at 14:42

I bleieve you may need to "push" the schema changes from the Publisher, as opposed to attempt to pull them from the client.

Follow the process for modifying an Article, for your specific replication topology, from the Books Online instruction here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms152493(SQL.90).aspx

Let me know how you get on.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, thanks for the post and I will read your link. I am alittle worried though about switching to a Push schema as my app is a "some-times" connected CRUD app that is not connected on any set schedule. –  Refracted Paladin Jun 9 '09 at 20:55
    
This is a nice read but based on our situation and this post here --> stackoverflow.com/questions/748848/… Using Push instead of Pull is a bad idea. Thoughts? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 14 '09 at 13:49

Don't write stored procedures...

I'll get my coat.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this inteded to be helpful or humorous? Just checking so I don't waste my time right at this moment. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 14:17
1  
Honestly, both. I agree 100% with Jeff that Stored Procedures are no longer the right answer. If you already have a business tier, just keep all of the logic there. Your life will be better for it. On the other hand, I realize that my comment seems snarky and unhelpful, and I do apologize for soap-boxing in your question. –  Bob King Jul 15 '09 at 14:20
    
Crazy errors like the ones you are getting are just par for the course in Stored Procedures. –  Bob King Jul 15 '09 at 14:22
1  
No problem, I enjoy humor I am just under the gun to fix this (due to my own mistake) and as such I am not functioning like normal. In a few days this will make me laugh. Also, If I had a choice I would follow Jeff's advice here as well but we work with what we are given sometimes. :( –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 14:23

At the very end of your procedure you have the following INSERT:

    INSERT INTO tblPersonRelationship 
        SELECT @RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID,
               MarriageDate, NULL, NULL, 
               ResidesWithPersonFlag, NULL, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram,
               UpdateUserID, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram, 
               UpdateUserID, NULL FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID

This code will break if you add one more column to tblPersonRelationship. So you need to replace this code with the following:

    INSERT INTO tblPersonRelationship(explicit list of columns you are providing values for)
        SELECT @RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID,
               MarriageDate, NULL, NULL, 
               ResidesWithPersonFlag, NULL, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram,
               UpdateUserID, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram, 
               UpdateUserID, NULL FROM tblPersonRelationship WHERE PersonRelationshipID = @ExistingRelationshipID

by "list of columns you are providing values for" I mean the list of values in your SELECT:

@RelatedID, @OpposingRelationship, @PersonID,
               MarriageDate, NULL, NULL, 
               ResidesWithPersonFlag, NULL, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram,
               UpdateUserID, UpdateDateTime, UpdateProgram, 
               UpdateUserID, NULL

Because you do not provide a value for your rowguid, do not include it in the list of columns.

share|improve this answer
    
You state that I need an explicit list of columns that I am providing a value for. Does that mean, since rowguid has a default value of newsequentialid(), that I do not need to list rowguid? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 15:23
    
I added an answer to your comment in the body of my original answer –  A-K Jul 15 '09 at 16:24

Continued from your other (deleted) question, let's dissect that error message:

Column name or number of supplied values does not match table definition.

I checked the number of values in both sides of the insert statement and they match, so that's not it. And sql server doesn't care about the column names in the VALUES list, so that's not it. This means that one of the column names in the INSERT list is wrong. You have a lot of names there — have you checked that you don't have a typo somewhere?

share|improve this answer
    
:-) Your quick(+1), I deleted that as soon as I realized my mistake. The mistake on the deleted post was that I thoght the Line# reported in the error was accurate when it is, in fact, not. Once I figured that out I realized that my issue was further down the SProc(not in the post) as what I listed had fixed that portion of it. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 15 '09 at 16:18

Are you replicating all tables and views which the stored procedure references?

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I am replicating all available articles. –  Refracted Paladin Jun 9 '09 at 20:54

scope_identity() for a Guid column? No you have to do a lot more work to get the new guid.

First you have to create a table variable:

DECLARE @outputIdTbl TABLE (ID uniqueidentifier)

Then you have to put that in the middle of your insert statement.

INSERT INTO [dbo].[Orders]
           ([AccountId]
           ,[InvoiceDate]
           ,[LastUpdate]
           ,[UserId]
           ,[Sent]
          ,IsCredit
           ,[Status]
          ,Note2)
    output INSERTED.id into @outputIdTbl 
    VALUES
           (@AccountId
           ,@InvoiceDate
           ,GetDate()
           ,@UserId
           ,@Sent
          ,@IsCredit
           ,@Status
          ,@Note2)

Then you can retrieve the value from the table variable.

select @OrderId = id from @outputIdTbl
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