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You're trying to decide who will win a game assuming optimal choices. The idea is there are x number of spaces, _ _ _ _ _ _ _. Player one goes and marks two consecutive spots. Then player two goes and does the same. The first player who cannot go WINS. So given the board before, this is one possiblity:

P1: x x _ _ _ _ _

P2: x x _ x x _ _

P1: x x _ x x x x

So player 2 wins. You're given an array where 0 represents a free space and 1 represents a marked spot. The array may have some spots already marked.

The only way I can think to do this is check every move, and for every move check if every possible move after results in a win. I can't even fully figure out how I would do this, but I was hoping there was a better way. Any ideas?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should work problems like this backwards.

Given all the possible game states, go through and decide which is a win for player 1 (W) and which is a win for player 2 (L). Initially, you only know the answer for the states where no one can play. In this case the answer is

  • W if no two consecutive spots and total number of taken spots is 4k
  • L if no two consecutive spots and total number of taken spots is 4k+2

Now work backwards. If there is any board position from which player 1 can move to a W, mark that as W, and if there is any board position from which player 2 can move to a L, mark that as L. Again, this won't get all positions marked right away, but iterating this will. The iterative part is this

  • W if there are 4k+2 spots and two consecutive spots which, when filled, give position marked W
  • L if there are 4k spots and two consecutive spots which, when filled, give position marked L

Example: Consider the board _ _ _ _ _ _. Evaluate from the final states working backwards

Player Two to move:

X X X X X X (L - terminal)

Player One to move:

X X _ X X _ (W - terminal)
_ X X _ X X (W - terminal)
_ X X X X _ (W - terminal)
X X X X _ _ (L - must move to X X X X X X)
_ _ X X X X (L - must move to X X X X X X)

Player Two to move:

X X _ _ _ _ (L - can move to X X X X _ _) 
_ X X _ _ _ (W - must move to _ X X _ X X or _ X X X X _)
_ _ X X _ _ (L - can move to X X X X _ _)
_ _ _ X X _ (W - must move to X X _ X X _ or _ X X X X _)
_ _ _ _ X X (L - can move to X X _ _ X X)

Player One to move:

_ _ _ _ _ _ (W - can move to _ X X _ _ _)

You can program this recursively so that each position will be evaluated as W or L. Let each board position P be represented by a binary vector of length n where 1 denotes a taken spot and 0 denotes an open spot. Here's the pseudocode for doesPlayerOneWin:

// STORE NUMBER OF ONES
int m = 0;
for (int i=0; i<n; ++i)
    m += P[i];
// LOOK FOR LEGAL MOVES
bool canMove = false;
for (int i=0; i<n-1; ++i)
    int[] newP = P;
    if (P[i]+P[i+1] == 0) {
        canMove = true;
        newP[i] = 1;
        newP[i+1] = 1;
        // PLAYER ONE CAN MOVE TO WIN
        if (m % 4 == 0 && doesPlayerOneWin(newP))
            return true;
        // PLAYER TWO CAN MOVE TO WIN
        if (m % 4 == 2 && !doesPlayerOneWin(newP))
            return false;
     }
}
// IF NO LEGAL MOVES, PLAYER TO MOVE WINS
if (!canMove && m % 4 == 0)
    return true;
else if (!canMove && m % 4 == 2)
    return false;
// OTHERWISE IF LOOP RUNS, PLAYER TO MOVE LOSES
if (m % 4 == 0)
    return false;
else
    return true;
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How would you mark if a particular state is a win or loss? Also, what is K? –  user1248092 Mar 14 '12 at 18:05
    
@user1248092 See my pseudocode above. The number k is any integer. The point there is that the number of taken spots is always even, so it is either of the form 4k or 4k+2 for some nonnegative integer k (e.g. if the number of spots taken is 14, then k = 3 because 14 = 4*3 + 2). –  PengOne Mar 14 '12 at 18:15
    
I just ran your code with the board [0,0,0,0] and it said false. P1 should win though. –  user1248092 Mar 14 '12 at 18:27
    
I just walked through it manually and that isn't the result I got. I included the details of this example in my latest revision. Perhaps there is an error in your implementation? –  PengOne Mar 14 '12 at 18:37
    
Are you missing some other conditional at the bottom? –  user1248092 Mar 14 '12 at 18:42

There is a theory that allows to solve such games.

Your game is an impartial game - where both players have the same moves from every position. Chess is not impartial, since white can control only white figures. The game ends when a player has no move, then he loses. Assume every game ends in bounded time.

You can analyze the positions, and label them, as PengOne suggested, L and W. A losing position is one where all possible moves lead to a winning position, and a winning position is one where there is at least one move to a losing position. A recursive, yet, well-defined labeling. When the player has no move, all successive positions are winning (a vacuous truth), so this is labeled as a losing position.

You can compute a bit more information, which will help you. Call mex(A) the smallest nonnegative integer not in A. For example, mex({0,1,5})=2 and mex({1,2,3})=0. Now you label every position with mex of all labels where you can move into. This is also a recursive, and well-defined labeling. A position is losing iff its value is 0. Under this classification, a position labeled 0 is losing, but you have a fine grained classification of winning positions with numbers 1,2,....

Those numbers allow you to compute value of a sum of two games. You can add two games, by playing them independently. During a move, you can either play in the first game, or in the second game. A position in your game ___X__X__ is in fact a sum of three games ___, __, __.

Sprague-Grundy theorem. Sum of N games valued a_1, a_2, ..., a_N is valued a_1 xor a_2 xor ... a_N. Therefore sum of N games is losing iff their values xor to 0.

Your initial position is a sum of K independent games, separated by Xs. You need to find Sprague-Grundy value of each empty strip ___...__, xor them, and return if the result is 0. I think you might get a hint of how to compute the values if you attempt to compute first 50 of them.

Since I do not like using this site as a replacement for work, I stop here. Hope you will be able to finish, if you are stuck, ask questions.

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Assuming optimal choices is actually an optimal startegy.

A common way to "chose" moves for a player, is using min-max algorithm. [it is actually the algorithm that was used by deep blue to win Kasparov]. Min-Max "choses" optimal move for each player in order to chose the move it will produce.

min-max algorithm is usually heuristic, and giving an evaluation to each state of the game, however - in your case, since you are looking for optimal moves and brute-force solution, you need to use min-max in each iteration until the game is concluded with a winner/loser, and this is the only evaluation of a board.

Using this method, you can determine which player will win using the value of the starting state - it will indicate if the player which you regarded as "me" is the winner or loser.

Note that for this specific case, where the board is evaluated only according to its final state, min-max decays into something very similar to @PengOne's solution.

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For what it's worth, here's a brute force solver written in Python. Fun! You can even run it with N > 2 for putting down larger spans of pieces for each turn. Note that the losing player just plays the left-most valid move.

First, the output. I ran the game at different board sizes (from 2 to 16 here).

Size = 2
..
11
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 3
...
11.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 4
....
.11.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 5
.....
11...
1122.
Player 2 Wins!

Size = 6
......
..11..
2211..
221111
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 7
.......
11.....
1122...
112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 8
........
.11.....
.1122...
.112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 9
.........
11.......
1122.....
112211...
11221122.
Player 2 Wins!

Size = 10
..........
....11....
22..11....
22..1111..
22221111..
2222111111
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 11
...........
11.........
1122.......
112211.....
11221122...
1122112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 12
............
.11.........
.1122.......
.112211.....
.11221122...
.1122112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 13
.............
...11........
22.11........
22.11.11.....
22.11.1122...
22.11.112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 14
..............
......11......
22....11......
22....1111....
2222..1111....
2222..111111..
222222111111..
22222211111111
Player 1 Wins!

Size = 15
...............
11.............
11...22........
1111.22........
1111.22.22.....
1111.22.2211...
1111.22.221122.
Player 2 Wins!

Size = 16
................
.....11.........
22...11.........
2211.11.........
2211.1122.......
2211.112211.....
2211.11221122...
2211.1122112211.
Player 1 Wins!

Here's the code:

N = 2 # number of pieces placed per turn

CACHE = {}

def compute_moves(board):
    gaps = [0] * len(board)
    previous = 0
    for i in range(len(board) - 1, -1, -1):
        if board[i]:
            previous = 0
            gaps[i] = 0
        else:
            previous += 1
            gaps[i] = previous
    return [i for i, gap in enumerate(gaps) if gap >= N]

def do_move(board, index, player):
    for i in range(N):
        board[index + i] = player

def undo_move(board, index):
    for i in range(N):
        board[index + i] = 0

def search(board):
    key = tuple(board)
    if key in CACHE:
        return CACHE[key]
    moves = compute_moves(board)
    for move in moves:
        do_move(board, move, 1)
        a, _ = search(board)
        undo_move(board, move)
        if not a:
            result = (True, move)
            break
    else:
        result = (False, moves[0] if moves else None)
    CACHE[key] = result
    return result

def play(board):
    player = 0
    while True:
        print ''.join(str(x or '.') for x in board)
        _, index = search(board)
        if index is None:
            break
        do_move(board, index, player + 1)
        player = int(not player)
    print 'Player %d Wins!' % (int(not player) + 1)

for size in range(2, 17):
    print 'Size = %d' % size
    board = [0] * size
    play(board)
    print
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