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Consider something like this:

class UsersTable
{
    public function findUserById($id)
    {
        $sql = "...";
        return $this->adapter->execute($sql);
    }
}

The entire class is pretty much nothing but methods that wrap SQL statements, and there is really no complex logic. I'd essentially be testing the SQL itself.

I know that tests that hit the database are often integration tests, but is this still an integration test since it's being tested so directly, as a unit test would be?

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2 Answers

I would say that because your testing more than just the logic of that specific unit (findUserById), that it's an integration test. If you want to properly unit test, I would look into mock objects and dependency injection. Since it looks like you're using PHP, I'll guess you're probably using phpUnit to unit test, and phpUnit allows mocking. To unit test this function, you would want to mock the execute method of the adapter member and assert that it was called once with the correct $sql string. For these purposes, I would say you should assume that the execute method is working correctly, so there's no need to test it. Here is a link to phpUnit's which describes their object mocking.

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I find that these integration tests are very useful, and compliment your pure unit tests in a nice way. They give you a good indication that your db is wired up correctly and compatible with your object model. When I include these types of test I don't tend to mock the db since I can just as easily do all the testing in the integration test. I do however recommend adding the data your are testing against as a precondition to the test.

I essentially follow this pattern:

1)Add user to DataBase 2)Call your method under test here 3)Assert that your retrieved user is the same as the one just created.

With this pattern you don't have to rely on existing data in the db that might change over time and make your tests fragile.

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