Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code:

extern void *malloc(unsigned int);
struct Box {
    int x, y ,w, h;
};

struct Wall {
    char color[15];
    struct Box *boxes[20];
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct Wall *mywall = malloc(sizeof(struct Wall));
    struct Box *myboxes[] = mywall->boxes;
    return 0;
}

gives me invalid initializer error at line 14. What I am trying to do, is to get a copy of array of struct pointers, which are in a different struct.

share|improve this question
1  
You cannot copy or assign arrays in C. (However, you can wrap them up into a struct, which can be assigned.) –  Kerrek SB Mar 14 '12 at 19:02
4  
Why not #include <stdlib.h> instead of extern void *malloc(unsigned int); ? –  glglgl Mar 14 '12 at 19:03
1  
@glglgl no particular reason. I wrote this piece of code just to demonstrate my point. I forgot where was malloc, and was too lazy to look for it. –  yasar Mar 14 '12 at 19:06
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ouch; there are a number of problems here.

extern void *malloc(unsigned int);

Don't do that; use #include <stdlib.h> because that will be correct and what you wrote is typically incorrect (the argument to malloc() is a size_t, which is not necessarily an unsigned int; it might be unsigned long, or some other type).

struct Box {
    int x, y ,w, h;
};

Apart from erratic space, struct Box is OK.

struct Wall {
    char color[15];
    struct Box *boxes[20];
};

And struct Wall is OK too.

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])

You aren't using argc or argv, so you'd be better using the alternative declaration of:

int main(void)

Original code again:

{
    struct Wall *mywall = malloc(sizeof(struct Wall));

This allocates but does not initialize a single struct Wall. Of itself, it is OK, though you should check that the allocation succeeded before you use it. You also need to worry about allocating the struct Box items that the elements of the array will point to.

    struct Box *myboxes[] = mywall->boxes;

You've got a minor catastrophe on hand here. You can't copy arrays like that. You haven't checked that you've got an array. Ignoring the error checking, you are stuck with one of:

    struct Box *myboxes[] = { &mywall->boxes[0], &mywall->boxes[1], ... };

or:

    struct Box **myboxes = &mywall->boxes;

I'm not convinced that you'd want the second version, for all it's shorter.

    return 0;

I like to see return 0; at the end of main(), even though C99 allows you to omit it.

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for effort! especially line by line explanation. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Mar 14 '12 at 19:16
add comment

How about:

struct Box **myboxes = mywall->boxes;

?

Then you can do stuff like:

 for ( int i = 0 ; i < 15 ; i++ )
    mywall->boxes[i] = malloc(sizeof(Box));
 Box* x = myboxes[1];

As the code is now, mywall->boxes isn't initialized.

NOTE: just re-read the question - this won't return a copy of the array, but point to the same location. There's no short solution for a copy without using memcpy or just copying the structs.

share|improve this answer
    
@KerrekSB my bad, fixed. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 14 '12 at 19:08
    
Thanks, this works. –  yasar Mar 14 '12 at 19:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.