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I am cleaning a huge database (SQL Server) and I want to know if it is possible to delete a line if the update statement violates the PK of table.

I want something like this:

UPDATE EMODCONCT SET CODPERLET = '2003' WHERE CODPERLET = '2003BI'
IF "UPDATE VIOLATES PK OF EMODCONCT" THEN
DELETE FROM EMODCONCT WHERE CODPERLET = '2003BI'
END
<DON'T SHOW ANY ERROR AND CONTINUE THE EXECUTION OF THE SCRIPT>

Is there any flag to detect this kind of error and a command to continue the execution without interruption by errors?

Thank you!

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If you have set up PK/FK relation between tables properly, it wont let you to update unless the pkData is available in the primary table. –  Kaf Mar 14 '12 at 19:06
3  
So....you want to change the value of the PK, eliminate the result if that new value is actually a duplicate and then continue?. Why don't you first delete all the values that would duplicate in the first place? –  Lamak Mar 14 '12 at 19:07

3 Answers 3

Why not check to see if the table contains the value first that way you don't get an error?

IF EXISTS(SELECT NULL FROM EMODCONCT WHERE CODPERLET = @newId)
BEGIN
    DELETE FROM EMODCONCT WHERE CODPERLET = @oldId
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    UPDATE EMODCONCT 
        SET CODPERLET = @newId
    WHERE CODPERLET = @oldId
END
share|improve this answer
    
Cause I am updating like 36 tables and every table has different primary key combinations; only "CODPERLET" is a common PK in then. In this case, I'll have to make a diff verification for every table and I was searching for a fast solution. But thanks anyway! –  Sawd Mar 15 '12 at 14:28
    
This is almost exactly the code you want to write from your example. The difference is in your question you are waiting for an error to occur, then handling it. I am detecting the condition that will case the error before it happens, and handling it the exact same way. You would probably write more code solving this problem with a try catch. –  cadrell0 Mar 15 '12 at 14:46
    
Try catch! How I've forgot this? I'd never used it on T-SQL, but will give it a try. Thanks. –  Sawd Mar 21 '12 at 13:02

How about using a TRY CATCH block.

BEGIN TRY
  UPDATE EMODCONCT SET CODPERLET = '2003' WHERE CODPERLET = '2003BI'
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
  IF ERROR_NUMBER() = 2627  -- Violates Primary Key
    DELETE FROM EMODCONCT WHERE CODPERLET = '2003BI'
END CATCH
share|improve this answer

Your data element names and sample data are not familiar to me so I will change them :)

Let's say the primary key for the Orders table is the compound of (product_name, customer_name). There are rows for the following propositions:

Colm orders freezer
Pete orders toaster
Ravi orders freezer
Ravi orders toaster

Requirement: update to change all orders for freezers to orders for toasters but if this causes a PK violation then delete the violating rows.

Colm orders freezer -> (row is altered to) Colm ordered toaster
Pete orders toaster -> (row is unaffected) Pete ordered toaster
Ravi orders freezer -> (row is deleted)
Ravi orders toaster -> (row is deleted)

Therefore:

  1. Remove rows where a customer has orders for both a freezer and a toaster.
  2. Alter rows where a customer has an order for a freezer to become an order for a toaster.

p.s. This sounds like a fairly unusual kind of update so I would urge you to double-check the spec with the designer to ensure their intent is clear.

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1  
Can anyone explain the downvote please? Clearly I'm using an analogy (as stated) but is my analysis wrong, perhaps? –  onedaywhen Mar 15 '12 at 13:51

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