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Self-references in object literal declarations

var obj = {
    value: 10,
    value2: value + 2
};

How can I do the above? (Assuming it's even possible)

I am using a lot of jQuery's $.extend to add more properties that rely on the previous values being added; so that modifying a few values automatically correct the rest.

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Jacob, vol7ron, gilly3, Brian Roach Mar 14 '12 at 23:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't do it in declaration, but you could always make a function. The following will always return a value 2 greater than that stored in value:

var obj = {
    value: 10,
    getValue2: function(){ return this.value + 2; }
};

If you don't want the value of value2 to change along with value, you could declare a placeholder variable and declare the object using that:

var placeholder = 10;

var obj = {
    value: placeholder,
    value2: placeholder + 2
};
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building on this answer, you could make value and value2 private variables and provide obj with a generic "get" function. –  jbabey Mar 14 '12 at 19:17
    
That should be this.value else you get error: 'value' is undefined. –  gilly3 Mar 14 '12 at 19:25
    
@gilly3 - Meant to have it there...typo. Fixed. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Justin Niessner Mar 14 '12 at 19:26
    
One point that should be made is that the two aren't functionally equivelant. In the first example, after initialization, obj.value2 is unrelated to obj.value. But, in your solution, when you increment obj.value, the result of obj.getValue2() is also incremented. jsfiddle.net/8zWNs –  gilly3 Mar 14 '12 at 19:49
    
@gilly3 - That's true, but if the OP truly wanted the behavior that you're talking about it would be easy enough to define the object without referencing a previous value. –  Justin Niessner Mar 14 '12 at 19:52
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I am not 100% sure if you can do this at the time of declaration. You could, however, do it afterwards:

using extend:

var obj = {
    value: 10
};

$.extend(obj, {
    value2: obj.value + 2
});

http://jsfiddle.net/KgKgf/

just javascript:

var obj = {
    value: 10
};

obj.value2 = obj.value + 2;

http://jsfiddle.net/KgKgf/1/

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Holy smokes, why would anyone use .extend() just to add a property to an object? Way overkill! Your second example is correct, but that first one is ... silly. –  gilly3 Mar 14 '12 at 19:27
    
@gilly3 i agree that it is not the proper tool for this job, but the OP mentioned he was using extend to add properties so i figured i would show an example using extend. –  jbabey Mar 14 '12 at 19:33
    
Fair enough... I missed that part in his question. –  gilly3 Mar 14 '12 at 19:38
    
@gilly3 thank you for removing your downvote :D –  jbabey Mar 14 '12 at 19:39
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