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I have been wondering about the general use of stubs for unit tests vs using real (production) implementations, and specifically whether we don't run into a rather nasty problem when using stubs as illustrated here:

Suppose we have this (pseudo) code:

public class A {
  public int getInt() {
    if (..) {
      return 2;
    }
    else {
      throw new AException();
    }
  }
}

public class B {
  public void doSomething() {
    A a = new A();
    try {
      a.getInt();
    }
    catch(AException e) {
      throw new BException(e);
    }
  }
}


public class UnitTestB {
  @Test
  public void throwsBExceptionWhenFailsToReadInt() {
     // Stub A to throw AException() when getInt is called
     // verify that we get a BException on doSomething()
  }
}

Now suppose we at some point later when we have written hundreds of tests more, realize that A shouldn't really throw AException but instead AOtherException. We correct this:

public class A {
  public int getInt() {
    if (..) {
      return 2;
    }
    else {
      throw new AOtherException();
    }
  }
}

We have now changed the implementation of A to throw AOtherException and we then run all our tests. They pass. What's not so good is that the unit test for B passes but is wrong. If we put together A and B in production at this stage, B will propagate AOtherException because its implementation thinks A throws AException.

If we instead had used the real implementation of A for our throwsBExceptionWhenFailsToReadInt test, then it would have failed after the change of A because B wouldn't throw the BException anymore.

It's just a frightening thought that if we had thousand of tests structured like the above example, and we changed one tiny thing, then all the unit tests would still run even though the behavior of many of the units would be wrong! I may be missing something, and I'm hoping some of you clever folks could enlighten me as to what it is.

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4  
test code has to be maintained as well, that's the unfortunate truth –  BrokenGlass Mar 14 '12 at 19:24
    
True. But as I see it you have no real chance to maintain a large test bed with hundreds of tests if the above problem occurs at any time. You for sure won't remember where to change the test code as well, so it seems like there must be another way to make discovering this "bug type" easier also because it seems to be a very reasonable scenario. I feel I am missing something. Something I don't see. Something about integration tests maybe? If we DID use the real implementation of A in B's test we would discover the problem instantly, as I mentioned in the post. –  johnrl Mar 14 '12 at 19:39
    
If you did couple the two classes toegther and they did a lot of logic between then then you would probably find your uniut tests very hard to write as just getting everything in a correct state a real pain. It fact you want to write loosly coupled tests so that a change in a dependency does not break a test that you are not testing. You should have one test that tests one thing so in theory you will have only one test that tests catching and throwing that exception. If you have this change in behavour riddled throughout your application then you want all those tests to start failing. –  aqwert Mar 14 '12 at 20:17

5 Answers 5

When you say

We have now changed the implementation of A to throw AOtherException and we then run all our tests. They pass.

I think that's incorrect. You obviously haven't implemented your unit test, but Class B will not catch AException and thus not throw BException because AException is now AOtherException. Maybe I'm missing something, but wouldn't your unit test fail in asserting that BException is thrown at that point? You will need to update your class code to appropriately handle the exception type of AOtherException.

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I see why it's difficult to see from pseudocode, but the point is that the test for B uses a stub that is hardcoded to throw AException. It was reasonable at the time the test was written (A DID throw AException). Then years passed and you forgot all about the test. You then change the implementation of A to throw another exception. Obviously you don't change the test for B, because you have no way of remembering that it assumed A was throwing AException. So in the end the problem is that the assumptions we made about the world when we wrote the test for B, isn't true anymore when we change A. –  johnrl Mar 14 '12 at 20:04
    
What he is trying to say is that if you do not change the implementation of B but should have then that is not a fault of existing unit tests (As they would pass). You should write a new test case for the change in behavour and try to get that to pass. In doing so you would probably change B to catch a different exception. At that point your legacy unit tests would fail alerting you to the fact that you have changed the behavour. So you have to decide is the new behavour correct or are the existing tests correct? Then you can fix your legacy unit tests. –  aqwert Mar 14 '12 at 20:10
    
How am I supposed to know which implementations to change? What I am looking for is for tests to tell me what I need to change. If you have thousands of objects using A then you can't possibly remember which needs changing and which does not. I guess the point here is that when you make an assumption about the behavior of an object (A) in one test (in B), you should write a unit test in A to test that this behavior really occurs! This would solve the problem, if we only then had a way to "link" the now failing unit test in A to the should-be-failing test in B. Question is; can we do that? –  johnrl Mar 14 '12 at 20:21
1  
The issue you have in this example is that how do you know that further classes up the chain also should handle the new exception? Unit test failure is to catch changes in classes that they test. If you change the behavour in their dependencies then you have to realise that this can have a far reaching impact. If you follow the SOLID principles then the situation you are describing should be a rare occurance. If this change is down to a fundermental design change then you will have to put in more effort to make sure all parts don't break. Unit tests in this case is not a silver bullet. –  aqwert Mar 14 '12 at 20:54
    
I guess you are right. In theory A would be an interface and its spec would say that getInt() should throw ExceptionA. When I change the interface and thus its spec I should know that is a serious change and should probably check all users of A and their tests and ensure they stay in sync. Should be pretty easy with modern IDE's to find whoever uses A:) –  johnrl Mar 14 '12 at 21:03

If you change the interface of class A then your stub code will not build (I assume you use the same header file for production and stub versions) and you will know about it.

But in this case you are changing the behaviour of your class because the exception type is not really part of the interface. Whenever you change the behaviour of your class you really have to find all the stub versions and check if you need to change their behaviour as well.

The only solution I can think of for this particular example is to use a #define in the header file to define the exception type. This could get messy if you need to pass parameters to the exception's contructor.

Another technique I have used (again not applicable to this particular example) is to derive your production and stub classes from a virtual base class. This separates the interface from the implementation, but you still have to look at both implementations if you change the behaviour of the class.

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It sounds like you are talking about languages lige C++ where defines are available. In my particular case the code above is Java (maybe not so clear sorry). Anyway, you have a good point about the stub code not building when changing A. But this is not completely true. If I use a mocking framework like jMock or Mockito to stub the interface with reflection then I won't notice the change. Problem is, I do use those frameworks. I feel they have many advantages, apart from this of course. –  johnrl Mar 15 '12 at 10:38

It's normal that the test you wrote using stubs doesn't fail since it is intended to verify that object B communicates well with A and can handle the response from getInt() assuming that getInt() throws an AException. It is not intended to check if getInt() really throws an AException at any point.

You can call that kind of test you wrote a "collaboration test".

Now what you need to be complete is the counterpart test that checks if getInt() will ever throw an AException (or a AOtherException, for that matter) in the first place. It's a "contract test".

J B Rainsberger has a great presentation on the contract and collaboration tests technique.

With that technique here's how you'd typically go, solving the whole "false green test" problem :

  1. Identify that getInt() now needs to throw a AOtherException rather than an AException

  2. Write a contract test verifying that getInt() does throw a AOtherException under given circumstances

  3. Write the corresponding production code to make the test pass

  4. Realize you need collaboration tests for that contract test : for each collaborator using getInt(), can it handle the AOtherException we're going to throw ?

  5. Implement those collaboration tests (let's say you don't notice there's already a collaboration test checking for AException at that point yet).

  6. Write production code that matches the tests and realize that B already expects an AException when calling getInt() but not a AOtherException.

  7. Refer to the existing collaboration test containing the stubbed A throwing an AException and realize it's obsolete and you need to delete it.

This is if you start using that technique just now, but assuming you adopted it from the start, there wouldn't be any real problem since what you'd naturally do is change the contract test of getInt() to make it expect AOtherException, and change the corresponding collaboration tests just after that (the golden rule is that a contract test always goes with a collaboration test so with time it becomes a no-brainer).

If we instead had used the real implementation of A for our throwsBExceptionWhenFailsToReadInt test, then it would have failed after the change of A because B wouldn't throw the BException anymore.

Sure, but this would have been a whole other kind of test -an integration test, actually. An integration test verifies both sides of the coin : does object B handle response R from object A correctly, and does object A ever respond that way in the first place ? It's only normal for a test like this to fail when the implementation of A used in the test starts to respond R' instead of R.

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The specific example you have mentioned is a tricky one.. the compiler cannot catch it or notify you. In this case, you'd have to be diligent to find all usages and update the corresponding tests.

That said, this type of issue should be a fraction of the tests - you cannot wave away the benefits just for this corner case.

See also: TDD how to handle a change in a mocked object - there was a similar discussion on the testdrivendevelopment forums (linked in the above question). To quote Steve Freeman (of GOOS fame and a proponent of the interaction-based tests)

All of this is true. In practice, combined with a judicious combination of higher level tests, I haven't seen this to be a big problem. There's usually something bigger to deal with first.

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Ancient thread, I know, but I thought I'd add that JUnit has a really handy feature for exception handling. Instead of doing try/catch in your test, tell JUnit that you expect a certain exception to be thrown by the class.

@Test(expected=AOtherException)
public void ensureCorrectExceptionForA {
    A a = new A();
    a.getInt();
}

Extending this to your class B you can omit some of the try/catch and let the framework detect the correct usage of exceptions.

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