Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I come from a procedural programming background, and need some help grasping how methods pass variables back and forth. The methods work with explicitly declared values, but when I try to pass values from one method to another, I get all kinds of "error: cannot find symbol" messages.

I suspect that I'm either a.) declaring the variables in the wrong place and they clear out at the end of the method or b.) how I'm coding the send/return of variables is wrong, or c.) both. More importantly, while I've read my textbook and a number of online tutorial resources, I'm still having trouble grasping how the syntax is supposed to work. Can someone clue me in?

The program: In the code provided, I'm trying to roll five six-sided dice. One method rolls a single die, the other calls that method multuiple times and writes the values to the array...I think.

Thanks in advance, d

public class FiveDice
{
// MAIN METHOD
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
// SET VARIABLES FOR DIE HIGH AND LOW VALUES, NUMBER OF DICE TO ROLL
      final int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE = 1;
      final int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE = 6;
      final int DICE_TO_ROLL = 5;
// ROLL A SINGLE DIE VIA METHOD rollADie()
          int roll = rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
      System.out.println("roll  " + roll);
    }
//
// RETURNS THE RESULT OF A SINGLE DIE ROLL
    public static int rollADie(int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)
    {
        int roll;
        roll = ((int)(Math.random()*100)%HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE+LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
        return roll;
    }
//
// CALL rollADie TO ROLL DICE_TO_ROLL (above) DICE; RETURN ARRAY OF ROLLED DICE
    public static int[] rollTheDice(int DICE_TO_ROLL, int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)
    {
            int rollNum;
        int rolledDie;
                for(rollNum=1;rollNum<=DICE_TO_ROLL;rollNum++)
                {
        int[] rolledDie = new rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)
        {
           rolledDie
        };
        return rolledDie[];
            }
      }

   } 
share|improve this question
    
Can you ask your question in two sentences? I'm sure someone will read it then. –  pvoosten Mar 14 '12 at 19:26
3  
Do you have a simple and specific question? –  Peter Lawrey Mar 14 '12 at 19:27
    
The code here is really just procedural - what do you think you are doing differently? –  Mark Mar 14 '12 at 19:33
    
Crap. I ~thought~ my methods were creating an object representing a single die roll and another object that represents multiple die rolls. I guess I don't grasp OO as well as I could...suggestions on what I'm missing? –  dwwilson66 Mar 14 '12 at 19:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll be honest, this is a total mess (but we were all new at one time, right)? What you really need to do is just go through the tutorials on writing Java apps, and especially object-oriented concepts, and learn as you go. The fundamental object-oriented concept, that methods represent actions/abilities of an object they're attached to, as opposed to being a list of mostly standalone functions/subroutines, will really help you see what's different about OO-programming vs. functional programming.

I'll go section-by-section and try to help you out here.

Section 1:

// MAIN METHOD
public static void main(String[] args)
{
  // SET VARIABLES FOR DIE HIGH AND LOW VALUES, NUMBER OF DICE TO ROLL
  final int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE = 1;
  final int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE = 6;
  final int DICE_TO_ROLL = 5;

  // ROLL A SINGLE DIE VIA METHOD rollADie()
  int roll = rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
  System.out.println("roll  " + roll);
}

Ok, so you've got a main method. Good start. All Java apps need this. However:

  • You're declaring final variables in the main method, which isn't really necessary. Remove the final key words here, re-capitalize the variable names to the camelCase convention, and just pass them in as normal variables.
  • Also, and this is just a style point, you're declaring lowestDieValue followed by highestDieValue, which makes total sense, but then you're passing them in highest first, then lowest. This feels a little weird and inconsistent, so I've flipped them around.
  • Finally, there's no reason to do your comments in ALL CAPS either, so as another style point, I would just use normal case. In your code, however, I think your variable and method names are descriptive enough; you really don't need the comments at all, so I've taken them out.

So section 1, after these changes, should look something like:

public static void main(String[] args) {
  int lowestDieValue = 1;
  int highestDieValue = 6;
  int diceToRoll = 5;

  int roll = rollADie(lowestDieValue, highestDieValue);
  System.out.println("roll  " + roll);
}

Section 2:

  • Re-order the variable names as noted above, and don't use ALL CAPS - by convention ALL CAPS are reserved for constants (i.e. final variables). When you pass it into a method, they're not finals/constants.
  • This method is overly verbose. It does exactly one useful thing, so it can be written in just a single line.

When you make these changes, section 2 should look like:

public static int rollADie(int lowestDieValue, int highestDieValue) {
  return ((int)(Math.random()*100)%highestDieValue+lowestDieValue);
}

Section 3:

This method can be greatly simplified. We're basically trying to accomplish three things:

  1. Create an array in which to store the rolled die values
  2. Loop through rolling dice to get the values, storing each created value in the array
  3. Return the resulting int[] (integer array)

You've got several problems in this method, including calling the return statement in the middle of a for loop (which is compilable, but is technically incorrect in your case as it results in your method returning early with only one value in the array).

I'm just going to completely re-write this method, including renaming/re-capitalizing your variable names according to the aforementioned conventions. The rewrite cleanly accomplishes the 3 things this method needs to do (as specified above):

public static int[] rollTheDice(int numDiceToRoll, int lowestDieValue, int highestDieValue) {
  int[] allDiceRolls = new int[numDiceToRoll];

  for(int i = 0; i < allDiceRolls.length; i++) {
    allDiceRolls[i] = rollADie(lowestDieValue, highestDieValue);
  }

  return allDiceRolls;
}

Finally:

  • Style: it's always been my habit to put opening { at the end of a line, as opposed to on their own line, but that's just a style thing. Either style is valid and means the same thing when compiled.
  • Code: Your class is called "FiveDice" but you don't actually roll 5 dice in your main method, nor do you ever call the rollTheDice method.
share|improve this answer
    
Made several revisions as I was going along. I think it's completely consistent and correct now. Good luck with Java! –  jefflunt Mar 14 '12 at 20:06
    
In part 3, for(int i = 0; i < allDiceRolls.length; i++): length being a String function, I would expect it to return an int representing the length of the String. allDiceRolls however, is already an integer. My assumption is that because the array has numDiceToRoll in it, the length of allDiceRolls is a count of the instances of memory reservations for that variable. Is that correct? or is it the number of BYTES stored in the array (e.g., 0-9 is 10 bytes, 0-10 is 12 bytes)? I wasn't able to find doc for non-String applications for this method. Thanks! –  dwwilson66 Mar 15 '12 at 2:51
    
When used on an array, like in this case, 'length' returns an integer that indicates the number of "slots" in the array. So, if you declare 'int[] array = int[5];' then 'array.length' will return the integer value '5' –  jefflunt Mar 15 '12 at 13:05
    
Great info! Thanks a lot! Your answers have been wonderfully complete and informative. Gratitude! –  dwwilson66 Mar 15 '12 at 17:28
int newVariable = return methodFromWhichDataIsReturned(fieldReturnedFromMethod);

The keyword return cannot be placed there. It indicates that you wish to exit the method that is currently executing so it can only be placed at the beginning of a line, such as return 3; When you're calling a method that returns a value, there's no need to place return in front. In other words, it should be:

int newVariable = return methodFromWhichDataIsReturned(fieldReturnedFromMethod);

The method rollTheDice should more likely be written as:

int rollNum;
int[] rolledDie = new int[DICE_TO_ROLL];
for (rollNum = 1; rollNum <= DICE_TO_ROLL; rollNum++) {
    rolledDie[rollNum - 1] = rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE, LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
}
return rolledDie;

In the second line above, we're creating a new array with DICE_TO_ROll number of elements. This array has integers and each integer will be 0 by default. We're now going to roll a die and each time rollADie has computed a value, we'll store it in rollADie at position rollNum - 1 (as arrays start at 0, so the first element is at rolledDie[0]). In the last line, we're returning the array from this method.

Lastly, in various languages it is a convention to write the names of constants in capitals and the names of regular variables otherwise. For example, the following line:

public static int rollADie(int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)

would commonly be written as:

public static int rollADie(int highestDieValue, int lowestDieValue)

or:

public static int rollADie(int highest_die_value, int lowest_die_value)
share|improve this answer

This is an excellent place to get started learning about how java classes and methods work when coming from another language. Specifically it appears that some object oriented concepts are eluding you in which case I'd recommend reading these.

Looking at your code you call rollADie correctly here:

int roll = rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);

However down here you try instantiating it like a class which won't work:

for(rollNum=1;rollNum<=DICE_TO_ROLL;rollNum++)
{
    int[] rolledDie = new rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)
    {
       rolledDie
    };
    return rolledDie[];
}

Try replacing this second block with this:

int[] rolledDiceValues;
for(rollNum=1;rollNum<=DICE_TO_ROLL;rollNum++)
{
    rolledDiceValues[rollNum] = rollADie(HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
}
return rolledDiceValues;

You have to wait for the for loop to complete iterating before you can return the array filled with the completed rolls of dice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks loads. This helps. When I ~see~ it, I can tell why it makes sense, and where I was messing up. Problem is that I understand the conceptual ideas of OO, but translating it to working code...that's another story entirely. :) I'll revisit javadoc and play some more. –  dwwilson66 Mar 14 '12 at 19:47

I can't look at your code since it's not exactly a specific snippet of code...it takes time to read and weave through that.

I'll attempt to address your primary concern - passing variables along. I've always thought of programming functions as math functions, in the sense that, whichever value I pass to the method is used.

As a for-instance: I have a method f(x) = 2x2-3x+7. x is clearly bound to the scope of this function.

If I have a variable y = 17, and I call my method with x = y, then the value 17 is used in place of x inside of f(x).


For Java, it's not that much different. You pass a value (with type as described in the API or specified by yourself), then expect a result (or void, if the return type is void). To take an example from your code...

public static int rollADie(int HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE,int LOWEST_DIE_VALUE)
    {
        int roll;
        roll = ((int)(Math.random()*100)%HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE+LOWEST_DIE_VALUE);
        return roll;
    }

...if I were to call this method with two int variables var1=15 and var2=17 it would look like this.

int myRoll = rollADie(var1, var2);

What we do when we pass variables to functions is accept that the variables that we are using in the signature (in this example, HIGHEST_DIE_VALUE and LOWEST_DIE_VALUE) are bound specific to the scope of rollADie. This means that those two variables have no significance outside of the method, save for their type.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah...functions always whipped my a** in school. :) But I get what you're saying. That helps frame it quite nicely. Thanks! –  dwwilson66 Mar 14 '12 at 23:59

Functions have a return type, that is what they return. They can only have one return. Once the function returns its execution ends.

public int foo()
{
return 1;
}

public int bar()
{
return 1;
// No code down here will execute
}

To set a value, say of type int myInt:

int myInt = foo(); // There is no reason to return here. If a function has a return it will return it regardless.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I'm reading you correctly, int myInt = foo(); is actually grabbing the 1 that's being returned from public int foo()...? is that an accurate understanding of what's happening? –  dwwilson66 Mar 14 '12 at 19:51
    
@dwwilson66 That is correct. –  wachpwnski Mar 14 '12 at 22:22

Have you tried reading up on java for instance looking at some of the tutorials available:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/index.html

share|improve this answer
    
I have. Specifically, I've looked at the Classes and Objects section extensively...and it just doesn't make sense. It's almost like referring to polygons and interest in the examples make my brain shut off... –  dwwilson66 Mar 14 '12 at 19:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.