Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assuming there are no restrictions in the characters that can be used in the individual Strings, and the Strings may be empty.

Edit:

Seems like the proper way to do this is to use a separator, and to escape occurances of that separator that already exist in any of the individual strings. Below is my attempt to this, which seems to work. Did miss any cases that will break it?:

public static void main(String args[])
{
    Vector<String> strings = new Vector<String>();
    strings.add("abab;jmma");
    strings.add("defgh;,;");
    strings.add("d;;efgh;,;");
    strings.add("");
    strings.add("");
    strings.add(";;");
    strings.add(";,;");


    String string = combine(strings);
    strings= separate(string);
    System.out.println();
}

static String combine(Vector<String> strings)
{
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    for(String string : strings)
    {
        //don't prepend a SEPARATOR to the first string
        if(!builder.toString().equals(""))
        {
            builder.append(";");
        }

        string = string.replaceAll(";", ",;");

        builder.append(string);
    }

    return builder.toString();
}

static Vector<String> separate(String string)
{
    Vector<String> strings = new Vector<String>();

    separate(string, strings, 0);

    return strings;
}

static void separate(String string, Vector<String> strings, int currIndex)
{
    int nextIndex = -1;
    int checkIndex = currIndex;

    while(nextIndex == -1 && checkIndex < string.length())
    {
        nextIndex = string.indexOf(';', checkIndex);
        //look back to determine if this occurance is escaped
        if(string.charAt(nextIndex - 1) == ',')
        {
            //this ones is escaped, doesn't count
            checkIndex = nextIndex + 1;
            nextIndex = -1;

        }
    }

    if(nextIndex == -1)
    {
        //no more remain  

        String toAdd = string.substring(currIndex, string.length());
        toAdd = toAdd.replaceAll(",;", ";");
        strings.add(toAdd);
        return;
    }
    else if(currIndex + 1 == nextIndex)
    {
        //empty string 

        strings.add("");
        separate(string, strings, nextIndex);
    }
    else
    {
        //there could be more

        String toAdd = string.substring(currIndex, nextIndex);
        toAdd = toAdd.replaceAll(",;", ";");
        strings.add(toAdd);
        separate(string, strings, nextIndex + 1);
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
2  
For what purpose? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 14 '12 at 20:10
    
Do you have any control over the non-separator strings? A common approach to the problem is to define a simple delimiter string/character, and then bar any of the constituent strings from containing the delimiter. –  dlev Mar 14 '12 at 20:12
    
@Hovercraft, for serializing/de-serializing a class composed of strings for persistence in a data structure that allows on a single string per mapping. –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 20:13
    
@dlev, this is a possibility. But I'd prefer not to restrict the characters, if possible and reasonably non-complex. –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 20:14
    
One common solution is to use a single character for the separator and to escape it (for example, by preceding it with a backslash) whenever it appears in one of the stings. Of course, if the escape character appears in a string it will also have to be escaped. –  Dennis Roberts Mar 14 '12 at 20:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

With your code, you can recover empty strings using the two-argument version of split:

String[] separate(String string)
{
    return string.split(SEPARATOR, -1);
}

If you can truly make no assumptions about the string contents, the only way to do this properly is by escaping the separator sequence (which can then be a single character) wherever it occurs in the source string(s). Obviously, if you escape the separator sequence, you need to unescape the result after splitting. (The escape mechanism will likely require additional at least one additional escape/unescape.)

EDIT

Here's an example (XML-inspired) of escaping and unescaping. It assumes that the separator sequence is "\u0000" (a single NULL character).

/** Returns a String guaranteed to have no NULL character. */
String escape(String source) {
    return source.replace("&", "&amp;").replace("\u0000", "&null;");
}

/** Reverses the above escaping and returns the result. */
String unescape(String escaped) {
    return source.replace("&null;", "\u0000").replace("&amp;", "&");
}

Many other variations are possible. (It is important that the replacements when unescaping are in reverse order from those used for escaping.) Note that you can still use String.split() to separate the components.

share|improve this answer
    
Any suggestions about the escape mechanism? Possibly I should do something like use ';' as a separator, and prior to concatenating I replace any instance of ';' with ';;'. And then I would have to parse the strings manually, because String.split cannot be instructed to ignore occurances of ';;'. So, on my manual parsing I would look for odd numbered occurances of ';', and split on those (and replace doubles of ';' with single ';')? –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 20:23
    
I added my original post with an attempt to do this. Any feedback? –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 20:45
    
@JamesWilliams - I added some sample code to my answer. –  Ted Hopp Mar 14 '12 at 20:47
    
Well, this is significantly simpler than my solution. Mainly because doing two escapes/unescapes allows me to use String.split(). –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 21:15

Take your Vector of Strings and convert it to a JSON object and store the JSON object.

( http://www.json.org/ and http://www.json.org/java/ )

share|improve this answer

You can build a class that stores the individual strings internally and then outputs a concatenated version of the strings when you call toString. Getting the original strings back is trivial as you already have them stored individually.

share|improve this answer
    
Should have specified: I am concatenating them for persistence, and then re-parsing the stored String later. When I re-parse, my previous objects will be unavailable. –  James Williams Mar 14 '12 at 20:16

You can have the same comportement in two lines of code using Google Guava library (Splitter and Joiner classes).

public String combine(Collection<String> strings) {
    return Joiner.on("yourUniqueSeparator").join(strings);
}

public Iterable<String> separate(String toSeparate) {
    return Splitter.on("yourUniqueSeparator").split(toSeparate);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Joiner doesn't work so well for null values. You need to pick a string to use as a null indicator and there are no guarantees that the null indicator you pick isn't present in the data. This is the same "questionable assumption" that OP was trying to avoid in picking a unique separator. –  Ted Hopp Mar 14 '12 at 20:38

Take a look at opencsv if you want to use delimited text. The api is rather easy to use, and it takes care of dealing with escaping quotes and the like. However, it treats null values as empty strings, so you might get a,,c if your input was { "a", null, "c" }. If that's not acceptable, you could use a recognizable string and convert it back later.

char tokenSeparator = ',';
char quoteChar = '"';
String inputData[] = {"a","b","c"};

StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
CSVWriter csvWriter = new CSVWriter(stringWriter, tokenSeparator, quoteChar);
csvWriter.writeNext(inputData);
csvWriter.close();

StringReader stringReader = new StringReader(stringWriter.toString());
CSVReader csvReader = new CSVReader(stringReader, tokenSeparator, quoteChar);
String outputData[] = csvReader.readNext();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.