Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to recreate the folder structure from a source in a target location and perform a command on each file found in the process using BASH.Based on some feedback and some searches I am trying to get this solution to work properly. Right now it is breaking because the windows folders have directories with spaces that it refuses to find.

I was able to get this to work after installing some additional features for my cygwin.

source='/cygdrive/z/austin1/QA/Platform QA/8.0.0/Test Cases'
target='/cygdrive/c/FullBashScripts'
# let ** be recursive
shopt -s globstar
for file in "$source"/**/*.restomatic; do
    cd "${file%/test.restomatic}"
    locationNew="$target${file#$source}"
    mkdir -p "$(dirname "$target${file#$source}")"
sed -e 's/\\/\//g' test.restomatic | awk '{if ($1 ~ /^(LOAD|IMPORT)/) system("cat " $2); else print;}' | sed -e 's/\\/\//g' |awk '{if ($1 ~ /^(LOAD|IMPORT)/) system("cat " $2); else print;}' > $locationNew
done
share|improve this question
    
I made a change to my answer that should take care of spaces in your file names; try it. –  George Skoptsov Mar 15 '12 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your bash version is 4 or above, this should work:

source="testing/web testing/"
target="c:/convertedFiles/"
# let ** be recursive
shopt -s globstar
for file in "$source"/**/*.test; do
    newfile= "$target/${file#$source}"
    mkdir -p "$(dirname "$newfile")"
    conversion.command "$file" > "$newfile"
done

${file#$source} lops $source off the beginning of $file.

If you can guarantee that no files have newlines in their name, you can use find to get the names:

source="testing/web testing/"
target="c:/convertedFiles/"

find "$source" -name \*.test | while read file; do
    newfile= "$target/${file#$source}"
    mkdir -p "$(dirname "$newfile")"
    conversion.command "$file" > "$newfile"
done
share|improve this answer
    
not sure what this error is... invalid shell option namept: globstar –  jheep Mar 14 '12 at 21:14
    
Hmm. I don't see globstar in the list of my shell options... also, will it recreate the path properly in the target directory or will each redirection attempt fail, saying the path does not exist? –  George Skoptsov Mar 14 '12 at 21:17
    
@jheep It's a relatively new option (linuxjournal.com/content/globstar-new-bash-globbing-option). You may not have it on your system. I know I don't, so it's a bad idea to rely on this option if you expect compatibility across arbitrary systems. –  George Skoptsov Mar 14 '12 at 21:18
    
I am using cygwin 1.7.11-1 i think? What would that line have done? –  jheep Mar 14 '12 at 21:25
    
just researched that, would have been a great option if it worked on my build –  jheep Mar 14 '12 at 21:49

Your best bet would be to find to get the list of files:

You can do it as follows:

export IFS=`/bin/echo -ne "\n"`         # set field separator to new lines only
cd testing                              # change to the source directory
find . -type d > /tmp/test.dirs         # make a list of local directories
for i in `cat /tmp/test.dirs`; do       # for each directory
   mkdir -p "c:/convertedFiles/$i"      # create it in the new location
done
find . -iname *.test > /tmp/test.files  # record local file paths as needed
for i in `cat /tmp/test.files`; do      # for each test file
   process "$i" > "c:/convertedFiles/$i"    # process it and store in new dir
done

Note that this is not the most optimal way -- but the easiest to understand and follow. This should work with spaces in filenames. You may have to tweak it further to get it to work under windows.

share|improve this answer
    
cd "c:/TestingSource/" find . -iname *.restomatic > /tmp/test.files tar --files-from=/tmp/test.files -cvf /tmp/test.tar cd "c:/TestingTarget/" tar xvf /tmp/test.tar didn't seem to work, am I missing something? Also where would i perform a sed command on the files in this script? –  jheep Mar 14 '12 at 21:22
    
@jheep Reload the page -- I've changed the answer because I misread your problem initially. –  George Skoptsov Mar 14 '12 at 21:24
    
No reason for the temporary file, you'd do better to just use for i in $(find -type d); do.... Also, no spaces is not a very good assumption on a Windows machine. –  Kevin Mar 14 '12 at 23:09
    
@kevin Yes, I said that it's not optimal, but easiest to understand and follow. I made a change that should fix the whitespace assumption. –  George Skoptsov Mar 15 '12 at 2:21

I would look into a tool called sshfs, or Secure Shell File System. It lets you mount a portion of a remote file system to somewhere local to you.

Once you have the remote fs mounted locally, you can run the follow shell script:

for f in *.*; 
do 
   echo "do something to $f file.."; 
done

EDIT: I initially did not realize that target was always local anyway.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.