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How can I do the following in JavaScript?

  1. Concatenate "1", "2", "3" into "123"

  2. Convert "123" into 123

  3. Add 123 + 100 = 223

  4. Covert 223 into "223"

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22  
Almost all JavaScript books I have read deal with these issues. But that's OK. Answering questions is what StackOverflow is all about. @Shadi Almosri--SO has a "don't be mean" rule. I don't see the point of belittling people who ask questions here, since that's the point of the place. –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 16:28
3  
@Nosredna: i completely understand asking questions, i love nothing more than answering them, but i think showing the fact that you've tried is better etiquette then simply expecting an answer and also better for a personal experience of learning. Just my opinion, not trying to be mean! :) –  Shadi Almosri Jun 9 '09 at 16:31
    
@Shadi, so how should the question have been asked? With a declaration of having looked for the answer already? –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 16:34
    
It struck me as sort of homeworky when I first saw it, but as I reread it I thought not, it seemed like someone experimenting in JavaScript and getting unexpected results and wanting to nail it down. That said, I wonder if the stackoverflow.com/faq might include something like an honor code for students. We're sort of a global university here, and I don't think it's crazy to try to figure out what a set of ethics might be for this place. Or maybe it is crazy. :-) –  artlung Jun 9 '09 at 16:36
4  
@Shadi, well, on the positive side, the question and answer are in StackOverflow, and hopefully will help other people. I see people get stuck on this stuff all the time, especially when coming from languages like Java. There's a reason people ask this over and over--it's because they THINK they know how expressions in JavaScript work, but they don't. They make assumptions based on experience outside JS. That's why it's so useful to sit down a try a few simple tests with adding strings and numbers, and trying unary plus and minus. –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 17:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 72 down vote accepted

You want to become familiar with parseInt() and toString().

And useful in your toolkit will be to look at a variable to find out what type it is - typeof:

<script type="text/javascript">
    /**
     * print out the value and the type of the variable passed in
     */

    function printWithType(val) {
        document.write('<pre>');
        document.write(val);
        document.write(' ');
        document.writeln(typeof val);
        document.write('</pre>');
    }

    var a = "1", b = "2", c = "3", result;

    // Step (1) Concatenate "1", "2", "3" into "123"
    // - concatenation operator is just "+", as long
    //   as all the items are strings, this works
    result = a + b + c;
    printWithType(result); //123 string

    // - If they were not strings you could do
    result = a.toString() + b.toString() + c.toString();
    printWithType(result); // 123 string

    // Step (2) Convert "123" into 123
    result = parseInt(result,10);
    printWithType(result); // 123 number

    // Step (3) Add 123 + 100 = 223
    result = result + 100;
    printWithType(result); // 223 number

    // Step (4) Convert 223 into "223"
    result = result.toString(); //
    printWithType(result); // 223 string

    // If you concatenate a number with a 
    // blank string, you get a string    
    result = result + "";
    printWithType(result); //223 string
</script>
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Step (1) Concatenate "1", "2", "3" into "123"

 "1" + "2" + "3"

Step (2) Convert "123" into 123

 parseInt("123", 10)

Step (3) Add 123 + 100 = 223

 123 + 100

Step (4) Covert 223 into "223"

 (223).toString() 

Put it all together:

 (parseInt("1" + "2" + "3", 10) + 100).toString()
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3  
Nice, clear example. Also, kudos for good form--you should always specify the radix for the parseInt function. –  hotshot309 Jan 3 '12 at 16:50
r = ("1"+"2"+"3")           // step1 | build string ==> "123"
r = +r                      // step2 | to number    ==> 123
r = r+100                   // step3 | +100         ==> 223
r = ""+r                    // step4 | to string    ==> "223"

//in one line
r = ""+(+("1"+"2"+"3")+100);
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These questions come up all the time due to JavaScript's typing system. People think they are getting a number when they're getting the string of a number.

Here are some things you might see that take advantage of the way JavaScript deals with strings and numbers. Personally, I wish JavaScript had used some symbol other than + for string concatenation.

Step (1) Concatenate "1", "2", "3" into "123"

result = "1" + "2" + "3";

Step (2) Convert "123" into 123

result = +"123";

Step (3) Add 123 + 100 = 223

result = 123 + 100;

Step (4) Convert 223 into "223"

result = "" + 223;

If you know WHY these work, you're less likely to get into trouble with JavaScript expressions.

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1  
I actually think this is extremely bad practice because it's fairly opaque as to waht's going on. Knowing that certain operations affect an implicit cast is a trick, and a good one to know, but it's not at all readable. Communication is everything. –  annakata Jun 9 '09 at 16:28
1  
I think it's important to know these things PRECISELY so you know what's going on when you read code. Much JavaScript is terse because it's transmitted as source, and small code can mean server cost reduction. –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 16:30
5  
You should be achieving this through compression tools though, in this form it's optimisation at a very real cost of maintenance. –  annakata Jun 9 '09 at 16:37
6  
Still, knowing these things would help prevent the question in the first place, which was a lack of knowledge on how JavaScript deals with strings and numbers. It's a matter of intellectual curiosity. What happens when I add a number to a string? How does unary plus work? If you don't know the answers, you don't really know JavaScript, and these kind of questions will come up. –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 17:15

You can do it like this:

// step 1 
var one = "1" + "2" + "3"; // string value "123"

// step 2
var two = parseInt(one); // integer value 123

// step 3
var three = 123 + 100; // integer value 223

// step 4
var four = three.toString(); // string value "223"
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13  
Best practice would be to add the radix parameter to the parseInt() function. so, parseInt(one, 10) assures that whatever you throw at it won't get misconverted. –  artlung Jun 9 '09 at 16:23
2  
Agreed. Otherwise, values starting with 0 will be seen as octal (base-8) numbers. –  hotshot309 Jan 3 '12 at 17:04
    
Even more unexpected, values starting with 0 and then containing 8 or 9 will fail, leading to a return of 0. E.g., parseInt('034') = 28, and parseInt('09') = 0. –  Robert Martin Sep 27 '12 at 20:23

To convert a string to a number, subtract 0. To convert a number to a string, add "" (the empty string).

5 + 1 will give you 6

(5 + "") + 1 will give you "51"

("5" - 0) + 1 will give you 6

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parseInt is misfeatured like scanf:

parseInt("12 monkeys", 10) is a number with value '12'
+"12 monkeys"              is a number with value 'NaN'
Number("12 monkeys")       is a number with value 'NaN'

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Simplest is when you want to make a integer a string do

var a,b, c;
a = 1;
b = a.toString(); // This will give you string

Now, from the variable b which is of type string we can get the integer

c = b *1; //This will give you integer value of number :-)

If you want to check above is a number. If you are not sure if b contains integer then you can use

if(isNaN(c*1)) {
  //NOt a number
}
else //number
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