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I'm using "users" table with over 2 millions records. The query is:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE 1 ORDER BY firstname LIMIT $start,30

"firstname" column is indexed. Getting first pages is very fast while getting last pages is very slow.

I used EXPLAIN and here are the results:

for

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM `users` WHERE 1 ORDER BY `firstname` LIMIT 10000 , 30

I'm getting:

id  select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref     rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  users   index   NULL    firstname   194     NULL    10030 

But for

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM `users` WHERE 1 ORDER BY `firstname` LIMIT 100000 , 30

I'm getting

id  select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref     rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  users   ALL     NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    2292912     Using filesort

What's the issue?

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Too much skipping. –  Sergio Tulentsev Mar 14 '12 at 21:35
    
Try running ANALYZE TABLE users statement and see if it helps. –  Salman A Mar 14 '12 at 23:06
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2 Answers

You shouldn't use limit to page that far into your dataset.

You'll get much better results by using range queries.

SELECT * FROM users 
WHERE firstname >= last_used_name 
ORDER BY firstname 
LIMIT 30

Where last_used_name is one that you already seen (I'm assuming that you do batch processing of some sort). You will get more accurate results if you do range queries on a column with unique index. This way you won't get the same record twice.

When you do

LIMIT 100000 , 30

MySQL essentially does the same as in

LIMIT 100030

Only it doesn't return first 100 thousands. But it sorts and reads them.

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Thanks for the answer.I'm using this for paginating the list. Getting last_used_name to create a link would make my code more difficult. Would be happy to get some good solution –  user1270172 Mar 14 '12 at 22:12
    
There ain't no such thing as free lunch, you know. Either you optimize your code, or suffer from slow LIMIT. I'll keep an eye on this post, maybe other solutions will emerge. –  Sergio Tulentsev Mar 14 '12 at 22:19
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For * queries without WHERE condition MySQL often does not use any indexes.

The following query should be much faster and make use of the index:

SELECT *
FROM (
  SELECT user_id
  FROM users
  WHERE 1
  ORDER BY firstname
  LIMIT $start, 30) ids
JOIN users
USING (user_id);

user_id is the primary key.

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