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I want to open a file from a Django app using open(). The problem is that open() seems to use whatever directory from which I run the runserver command as the root.

E.g. if I run the server from a directory called foo like this

$pwd
/Users/foo
$python myapp/manage.py runserver

open() uses foo as the root directory.

If I do this instead

$cd myapp
$pwd
/Users/foo/myapp
$python manage.py runserver

myapp will be the root.

Let's say my folder structure looks like this

foo/myapp/anotherapp

I would like to be able to open a file located at foo/myapp/anotherapp from a script also located at foo/myapp/anotherapp simply by saying

file = open('./baz.txt')

Now, depending on where I run the server from, I have to say either

file = open('./myapp/anotherapp/baz.txt')

or

file = open('./anotherapp/baz.txt')
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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The solution has been described in the Favorite Django Tips&Tricks question. The solution is as follows:

import os
module_dir = os.path.dirname(__file__)  # get current directory
file_path = os.path.join(module_dir, 'baz.txt')

Which does exactly what you mentioned.

Ps. Please do not overwrite file variable, it is one of the builtins.

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Thanks again. Obviously Python is not my normal weapon of choice. –  Paul Hunter Mar 14 '12 at 23:22
    
This was just what I needed for my own issue. Thanks! –  odedbd Jun 27 '13 at 11:52
    
What if you need to go one step inner. i mean what if baz.txt file is inside some folder in module_dir lets say foo/baz.txt? –  Clayton Feb 12 at 10:11
    
@user570826: Either try file_path = os.path.join(module_dir, 'foo/baz.txt') or file_path = os.path.join(module_dir, 'foo', 'baz.txt'). –  Tadeck Feb 12 at 21:29
    
thanks :) alot .. –  Clayton Feb 19 at 12:17

I think I found the answer through another stack overflow question (yes, I did search before asking...)

I now do this

pwd = os.path.dirname(__file__)
file = open(pwd + '/baz.txt')
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Just FYI: You can also do this: import socket, then you can use socket.gethostname() to determine hostname of the system you're on. Set up your path based on which hostname is returned. –  Furbeenator Mar 14 '12 at 23:03
2  
@PaulHunter: Instead of pwd + '/baz.txt' you should use os.path.join(pwd, 'baz.txt'). –  Tadeck Mar 14 '12 at 23:08
    
Thanks for that! –  Paul Hunter Mar 14 '12 at 23:17

I would suggest using an absolute path instead of relative path. That would eliminate this issue.

file = open('/Users/foo/myapp/anotherapp/baz.txt')

Otherwise, you'd have to create an if statement block reading the current directory, and if the runserver was run from anywhere outside your if statement options, it would still blow up.

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1  
The problem with this solution is that I am testing on my own laptop, but deploying to another server with different paths, which would mean that I would have to change the paths every time I deploy. –  Paul Hunter Mar 14 '12 at 22:57

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