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When you write a class which throws exception, is it a good idea to handle the exception within the class? Or is it better to let the user of the class handle it in the main program?

for example, is it a good idea to write a class with the following?

class Queue{
    Object Queue<Object>::getFront( )
    {
        try
        {
            if( isEmpty( ) )
                throw Underflow( );
        } catch(Underflow E)
        {
            cerr<<"caught underflow\n";
            return null;
        }
        return queuearray[ front ];
    }
}

or is it better to just have

Object Queue<Object>::getFront( )
{
    if( isEmpty( ) )
        throw Underflow( );
    return queuearray[ front ];        
}

and then let the user implement the exception in the main or wherever the function is being called?

share|improve this question
    
Why on earth would you do that? –  SLaks Mar 14 '12 at 23:11
    
which one are you talking about? the first or the second? –  mma1480 Mar 14 '12 at 23:17
    
The first. That's no better than a simple if. –  SLaks Mar 14 '12 at 23:18
    
well i just want to understand the purpose of using exceptions, like when to use it and such, but from the looks of it, it seems like there are better ways to handle errors rather than using exceptions –  mma1480 Mar 15 '12 at 7:17
    
The point of exceptions is to communicate up the call stack. Your second example is just a more complicated version of an if statement. –  SLaks Mar 15 '12 at 16:40
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1 Answer

It depends on where it's best to handle the exception. If the exception is recoverable and doesn't affect the flow of the program then you can quietly handle it and log it. If you think that the caller might be able to better decide what to do, then throw the exception.

Remember that you should only be using exceptions where the circumstances are really exceptional - things outside of the control of the application. The example that you state above isn't really ideal. If you are throwing the exception, why bother catching it on the line below? Just do

class Queue{
Object Queue<Object>::getFront( )
{
    try
    {
        if( isEmpty( ) )
           return null;
    }
    return queuearray[ front ];
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
i see. thank you. Then when is it ideal to throw and handle exceptions if you can just use if statements. it seems like it makes things really complicated more than it needs to be. –  mma1480 Mar 15 '12 at 7:06
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