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I have Python 2.7 amd64 running on Windows 7 + latest Twisted 12 I have very simple programm which connects stdin/stdout with remote tcp server

from twisted.internet import stdio, reactor, protocol
from twisted.protocols import basic

class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):
    def connectionMade(self):
        self.factory = CFactory()
        self.connector = reactor.connectTCP('remote', 8585, self.factory)

    def lineReceived(self, line):
        self.connector.transport.write("%s\n" % line)

class Client(basic.LineReceiver):
        def lineReceived(self, line):
                delimiter = '\n'
                print "%s" % line

class CFactory(protocol.ClientFactory):
        protocol = Client


def main():
    stdio.StandardIO(Echo())
    reactor.run()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

On Linux it works just fine. But on Windows my input to stdin is being ignored. So nothing being sent to remote side

Any idea why?

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3 Answers 3

class Client(basic.LineReceiver):
    def lineReceived(self, line):
        delimiter = '\n'
        print "%s" % line

The delimiter = '\n' line here has no useful consequences. It defines a new name in the local scope of the lineReceived function, and then ignores that local name.

What you intended to do, I think, is:

class Client(basic.LineReceiver):
    delimiter = '\n'

    def lineReceived(self, line):
        print "%s" % line

This defines a new attribute of the Client class, delimiter, which controls how the base class, basic.LineReceiver, splits up lines.

However, your example program only defines Client, it doesn't actually use it. So this isn't the cause of the problem. The cause of the problem is very similar, though. Echo is used to handle standard input, and it does not override the default LineReceiver delimiter at all. The default is '\r\n', which is not the line delimiter used on Windows standard input.

Start off your Echo definition like this:

class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):
    delimiter = '\n'

and I think the program will behave as you want, since Windows uses "\n" to delimit lines on standard input (no Windows machine around to verify that, though, so you might want to double check; if that's not the case, a very useful response to make would be to explain what the delimiter is; if it is the case, verifying that information would also be a good thing).

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nope. Doesn't work either. The same behaviour. Some windows-specific bug –  Dmytro Leonenko Mar 17 '12 at 0:36
1  
My mistake. I see that Client isn't actually even used anywhere in your example, only defined. Answer updated. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Mar 18 '12 at 23:20
    
Doesn't work either. I just want python to send data on Enter press. When I input something and press Enter - nothing happens. But when I Ctrl-c after that I can see "my input" command not found bla-bla-bla in cmd –  Dmytro Leonenko Mar 20 '12 at 10:03
    
Can you determine what newline delimiter Windows uses, as I asked in my updated answer? –  Jean-Paul Calderone Mar 20 '12 at 15:50
    
How do I determine that? –  Dmytro Leonenko Mar 20 '12 at 16:11

Try dataReceived, it might work.:

class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):
...
    def dataReceived(self, data):
        self.connector.transport.write("%s\n" % data)
...
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On Windows a patch is required to fix the problem of receiving input from Std I/O. Refer to solution posted to ticket # 2157 on twistedmatrix.com here: http://twistedmatrix.com/trac/ticket/2157

The solution has several attachments - for individual patches. And there is a consolidated patch file which is an unified diff.

I have a 64-bit Python 2.7.3. running on a Windows 7 64-bit machine with Twisted 12.3.0 and I applied the above unified patch to the _win32stdio.py, _pollingfile.py, conio.py. This allows the input and output to/from Std I/O for IProtocol implementations.

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