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I have some code below which will not run due to me not being able to know how to call a function that's within the same class as another function. I've already tried using $this but it gives me a PHP error Using $this when not in object context...Line 25. I have no clue how to fix this and I'm hoping someone else can give me some tips on what to do. My code is below, thanks :)

class SESSION {
    function start() {
        session_start();
    }
    function check() {
        if ($_SESSION["username"]) {
            return $_SESSION["username"];
        } else {
            return "nli"; //Not logged in :(
        }
    }
    function set_session($username) {
        $_SESSION["username"] = $username;
    }
    function login($username, $password) {
        $database = DB::connect();
        $passwordsha = sha1($password);
        $query = "";
        $res = $database->query($query);
        $num = $res->num_rows;
        if ($num == 0) {
            header("Location: login.php?e=1");
        } elseif ($num == 1) {
            $this->set_session($username);
            header("Location: admin.php");
        } else {
            header("Location: login.php?e=2");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you attempting to run this statically? Or are you actually creating an object and manipulating it? Session::login($a, $b) vs. $pSession = new Session(); $pSession->login($a, $b); – John Green Mar 15 '12 at 0:29
    
Through other files I have used require() on this file to do Session::login() but in this case I need to call set_session() from login(). And no, I'm not creating the object. – Josh Mar 15 '12 at 0:31
    
What version of PHP are you running? Although there is no scope resolution (defaults to public), when you create a function within a class construct it becomes a method (still uses function keyword tho). The call to $this->set_session looks like it should work. What does the calling code look like? – Mike Purcell Mar 15 '12 at 0:32
2  
@scjosh - If you're not creating an object, you're not creating a this. The simplest thing to do is to use the function statically: "self::set_session($username)" -- HOWEVER, this is bad form. You should mark your functions as static when they're static, or use them as object methods, never both. – John Green Mar 15 '12 at 0:35
1  
There's plenty of reasons to make a custom session handling class, but you're not using any of them here. However, the most egregious fault of your code is that it's using PHP 4 syntax when it should be using PHP 5 syntax, which would make the public/private/static definitions clear and it'd be much clearer what you intended with your code. – Jason Mar 15 '12 at 2:17
up vote 7 down vote accepted

And no, I'm not creating the object

This is why the call to $this->set_session($username); is failing, if you want to follow the same code pattern you have in place you can do this:

if ($num == 0) {
    header("Location: login.php?e=1");
} elseif ($num == 1) {
    self::set_session($username);
    header("Location: admin.php");
}
share|improve this answer

If you use login as class method, then you have to write like this:

SESSION::set_session($username);
share|improve this answer

You must define set_session function as private. That way you can reference it using this->set_session

private function set_session($username) {
    $_SESSION["username"] = $username;
}
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