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I've got a Ruby program that keeps telling me that various files do not exist when it runs.

The paths are absolute, and the files do exist at the time the program runs. When the program is run again, everything works fine. There is absolutely nothing special about the code, and it works for thousands of other files at the same time, just not certain files at certain times, apparently.

It's Ruby 1.8.7 on latest stable Cygwin on Windows 2003.

What could possibly be going on here?

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"When the program is run again, everything works fine." -- oh okay, didin't understand this part. Well, it's probably not a ruby thing but a system thing. I suppose it could be something odd happening when multiple ruby threads/processes are accessing the filesystem at the same time -- maybe there's something about the windows/cygwin IO that doesn't allow concurrent access. Is there a general system log you can check? – John Bachir Mar 15 '12 at 18:38

If you're on cygwin, maybe you're using the wrong type of slashes? (forward vs. back)

Try something simple to experiment. Make a test file somewhere and try a bunch of ways to get to it.

File.exists?('c:/test.txt')
File.exists?('c:\test.txt')
File.exists?('/test.txt')
File.exists?('\test.txt')

(I don't know windows/cygwin so I don't know what the full space of things to try would be)

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The path is the same each time, but with different results. It seems like an utterly random fraction of the File.exists? calls fail. As I said, the program can usually just be run again with no error. – John Cromartie Mar 15 '12 at 18:13

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