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is it possible to send 2 consecutive TCP packets out as seen in this picture here: enter image description here

I currently have set TCP_NODELAY to true and SO_SNDBUF to 0. I have also called send in my program 2x. This is the result I obtained:

enter image description here

The main issue here will be the delayed-ack causing the slow network performance in the 2nd screenshot.

The code for the server:

DWORD WINAPI ServerHandler(void *lp){
    //The port you want the server to listen on
    int host_port = 1852;

    //Initialize socket support WINDOWS ONLY!
    unsigned short wVersionRequested;
    WSADATA wsaData;
    int err;
    wVersionRequested = MAKEWORD( 2, 2 );
    err = WSAStartup( wVersionRequested, &wsaData );
    if ( err != 0 || ( LOBYTE( wsaData.wVersion ) != 2 || HIBYTE( wsaData.wVersion ) != 2 )) 
    {
        printf("Could not find useable sock dll %d\n",WSAGetLastError());
        return 0;
    }

    //Initialize sockets and set any options
    int hsock;
    BOOL bOptVal = true;
    int bOptLen = sizeof (BOOL);
    int iResult = 0;

    hsock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
    if(hsock == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        printf("Error initializing socket %d\n",WSAGetLastError());
        return 0;
    }

    iResult = setsockopt(hsock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, (char *) &bOptVal, bOptLen);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR)
        printf("setsockopt for SO_REUSEADDR failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
    else
        printf("Set SO_REUSEADDR: ON\n");

    iResult = setsockopt(hsock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_KEEPALIVE, (char *) &bOptVal, bOptLen);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR)
        printf("setsockopt for SO_KEEPALIVE failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
    else
        printf("Set SO_KEEPALIVE: ON\n");

    //Bind and listen
    struct sockaddr_in my_addr;

    my_addr.sin_family = AF_INET ;
    my_addr.sin_port = htons(host_port);

    memset(&(my_addr.sin_zero), 0, 8);
    my_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY ;

    if( bind( hsock, (struct sockaddr*)&my_addr, sizeof(my_addr)) == SOCKET_ERROR )
    {
        printf("Error binding to socket, make sure nothing else is listening on this port %d\n",WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(hsock);
        return 0;
    }
    if( listen( hsock, MAXCONN) == SOCKET_ERROR )
    {
        printf("Error listening %d\n",WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(hsock);
        return 0;
    }

    //Now lets to the server stuff

    int* csock;
    sockaddr_in sadr;
    int addr_size = sizeof(SOCKADDR);

    printf("waiting for a connection\n");

    while(true)
    {            
        csock = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
        if((*csock = accept( hsock, (SOCKADDR*)&sadr, &addr_size))!= INVALID_SOCKET )
        {
            printf("Received connection from %s, %u @ socket %d\n", inet_ntoa(sadr.sin_addr), sadr.sin_port, *csock);

            BOOL bOptVal = true;            
            int iResult = setsockopt(*csock, SOL_SOCKET, TCP_NODELAY, (char *) &bOptVal, sizeof(bOptVal));
            if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR)
                printf("setsockopt for TCP_NODELAY failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
            else
                printf("Set TCP_NODELAY: TRUE\n");

            int sendBuf = 0;
            iResult = setsockopt(*csock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_SNDBUF, (char *) &sendBuf, sizeof(sendBuf));
            if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR)
                printf("setsockopt for SO_SNDBUF failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
            else
                printf("Setsockopt for SO_SNDBUF set to 0\n");


            CreateThread(0,0,&SocketHandler, (void*)csock , 0,0);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("Error accepting %d\n",WSAGetLastError());
        }
    }
    WSACleanup();
}

The code I used for sending data:

int send_TCP_2(int cs, char responseLength[], char data[], int respond_length, int data_length)
{   
    int size = respond_length + data_length;
    int index = 0;

    // combined 10 byte response with data as 1 packet
    std::vector<char> packet(size);

    for(int i=0; i<respond_length; i++)
    {
        packet[index] = responseLength[i];
        index++;
    }

    for(int i=0; i<data_length; i++)
    {
        packet[index] = data[i];
        index++;
    }

    int status;
    char *data_ptr = &packet[0];
    while(size > 0)
    {
        status = send(cs, data_ptr, size, 0);
        if(status > 0)
        {
            data_ptr += status;
            size -= status;
        }
        else if (status == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            int error_code = WSAGetLastError();
            printf("send_TCP_2 failed with error code: %d\n", error_code);
            return 0;   // send failed
        }
    }
    return 1;   // send successful  
}

enter image description here

I have attached the screenshot when I do not disable Nagle and not touching SO_SNDBUF.

share|improve this question
1  
What makes you think the size of the packets (and not something else) is affecting the network performance? Are the two screenshots from the same pair of computers on the same network? – Adam Liss Mar 15 '12 at 3:05
2  
TCP_NODELAY should be enough here. – Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 15 '12 at 3:10
1  
In what way do you imagine delayed ack causes slow network performance? The sending TCP stack should not be waiting to get the delayed ack before sending the next statement. – Kaz Mar 15 '12 at 3:19
3  
TCP is a sliding window protocol, not a stop-and-wait protocol. – Kaz Mar 15 '12 at 3:19
1  
Remove all of your settings changes. Then, test again. If you have a performance problem, post the trace so we can figure out what's wrong. But by pessimizing the stack, you are creating the problems you are seeing and ruining any hope of finding and fixing them. (Most likely, the problems you are having now are caused by small writes, Nagle being disabled, and small buffers. These are all problems you created.) – David Schwartz Mar 15 '12 at 8:21

The main issue here will be the delayed-ack causing the slow network performance in the 2nd screenshot.

No it won't. You are mistaken about that. You don't have any control over TCP packetization, or rather segmentation, and you don't need it. TCP is a highly optimized stream transfer protocol developed over more than 30 years.

share|improve this answer
    
+1,000 You are trying to fix something that is not broken. At best, you won't break it. (However, more likely, you will break it by forcing small writes.) – David Schwartz Mar 15 '12 at 8:19
    
EJP is very very right... – Malkocoglu Mar 15 '12 at 8:52
    
TCP ain't perfect. TCP is the hammer we have, so we keep nailing screws into the wall. For request/response communication, TCP has notable shortcomings, especially with regard to windowing. There's plenty of discussion on the web about the downsides of the TCP windowing scheme in conjunction with the tendency of modern HTTP to open a boatload of TCP connections. – Dave Dopson May 18 '12 at 18:56

TCP_NODELAY option set to TRUE should fix the delayed_ACK problem. I once had to send the network packet twice but i did it in the ETHERNET (driver) layer and it worked there (the delayed_ACK was caused by the other party), but in this layer (SOCKET layer) you can not do such a thing. Also, do not set SO_SNDBUF to 0...

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

thanks for all the advise! Setting TCP_NODELAY to true will work as mentioned by most. I have made a silly mistake in setsockopt!

I should have put IPPROTO_TCP instead of SOL_SOCKET

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