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I have a function that needs to remove leading whitespace from a string. For some reason, this does not work:

static void remove_leading_spaces(char* line)
{  
   int i;
   for(i = 0; line[i] == ' '; i++);      //iterate through till whitespace     
   line = line + i;                      //  advance the pointer to point to
                                         //  the first non space character
}

For example, if I have a string with a single leading whitespace, the string will not be altered.

Thanks everyone the answers are correct for remove_leading_spaces!

How would I do this with a string that needs to be returned from the function that calls this function? I have been trying the same approach and I keep getting a segmentation fault? Is it the same exact concept?

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1  
What doesn't work? What actually happens and what did you expect to happen? –  Andrew Marshall Mar 15 '12 at 2:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the function below you are passing the pointer by value.

static void remove_leading_spaces(char* line) 

Which means any change to line in the body is not reflected in the caller. You need to change your function like this:

static void remove_leading_spaces(char** line) 
{   
   int i; 
   for(i = 0; (*line)[i] == ' '; i++) { } // the ';' is a HUGE TRAP prefer { }
   *line += i;
} 

EDIT

Be careful NOT to free line after this as you would not deallocate the entire string. If the memory was dynamically allocated, you'll need to keep a backup copy of the original pointer to safely free it.

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Parameters are passed by value in C. So even though you change the value of line here:

line = line + i;

the value of the pointer that you pass into remove_leading_spaces() doesn't change. If you want this to change the pointer in the caller, you'll need to pass the address of the pointer (which is how you pass by reference in C):

static void remove_leading_spaces(char** line)
{  
   int i;
   for(i = 0; (*line)[i] == ' '; i++);     
   *line = *line + i;
}
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The code only skips blanks, rather than generic white space (which includes tabs, newlines, etc). So, the more generic solution would use isspace() from #include <ctype.h> (or you would use 'blanks' or 'spaces' instead of 'white space').

More seriously, you find where the first non-blank is, but you don't report this to the calling function. Remember, values are passed by reference, including pointers. You'd have to pass a pointer to pointer (and make other adjustments to the code) to return the changed value through the argument list. 'Tis simpler to do:

static char *find_first_non_white_space(char *line)
{
    while (isspace((unsigned char)*line))
        line++;
    return line;
}

Or with indexes:

static char *find_first_non_white_space(char *line)
{
    int i = 0;
    while (isspace((unsigned char)line[i]))
        i++;
    return &line[i];
}

The cast is necessary if char is a signed type, as it is on some systems.

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Because you're passing line by value, you're changing its copy inside the function, but the variable that you're passing to this function in the calling code will not change. One way to 'fix' this is to pass your function pointer to a C string, i.e. char **line, instead of char *line.

Be aware, though, that depending on how you allocate your string, you may leak memory by simply advancing the pointer forward, and you definitely won't be able to deallocate it later. A better way to accomplish this is to copy the rest of the string to its original start; it will be less 'efficient', but more correct in the long run. And you won't even have to change the function signature.

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The function only modifies the value of line within the scope of the function. The simplest solution is for remove_leading_spaces to return line + i and have the calling code assign this return value to a variable within its own scope.

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Try

static void remove_leading_spaces(char* line)
{
   char *copyFrom = line;
   for (; *copyFrom && ' ' == *copyFrom; ++copyFrom);
   memmove(line, copyFrom, strlen(copyFrom));
}

It will change the string to be the part after leading spaces. Note it also works if there are only leading spaces.

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strcpy's arguments are restrict-qualified, meaning (among other things) that the supplied strings can't overlap, or else Undefined Behavior will result. memmove should be used instead. –  jwodder Mar 15 '12 at 2:42
    
Your right - should really go to bed!. Have edited. –  Ed Heal Mar 15 '12 at 2:48

When you change the pointer within the method, it doesn't change the pointer that was passed in on the calling side. If you want to change that, you need to pass in a pointer to that pointer (char **cpp) and change it through that ((*cpp)++).

If the string was malloced, remember to save another pointer so you can free it.

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Postfix ++ has higher precedence than unary *, so *cpp++ parses as *(cpp++), which isn't what you want. Use (*cpp)++ instead. –  jwodder Mar 15 '12 at 2:53

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