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Here is a sample python module:

# foo.py
class Foo(object):
    a = {}
    def __init__(self):
        print self.a
        self.filla()
    def filla(self):
        for i in range(10):
            self.a[str(i)] = i

then I do this in python shell:

$ python
Python 2.7.2 (default, Jan 13 2012, 17:11:09) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> from foo import Foo
>>> f = Foo()
{}
>>> f = Foo()
{'1': 1, '0': 0, '3': 3, '2': 2, '5': 5, '4': 4, '7': 7, '6': 6, '9': 9, '8': 8}

Why the second time a is not empty? Am I missing something trivial.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that a is not bound. It is a property of the class, not the object. You want to do something like this:

# foo.py
class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = {}
        print self.a
        self.filla()
    def filla(self):
        for i in range(10):
            self.a[str(i)] = i
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The strange thing, honestly, is that everyone finds this behaviour counterintuitive simply because it's not what happens in Java, C++, C# etc. Actually, Python's behaviour makes perfect sense, and the alternate behaviour is strange. In Python, everything declared inside class is part of the class, as opposed to functions (methods) being part of the class (possibly indirectly connected to the objects to make polymorphism work) while data members (fields) are part of each constructed object unless otherwise marked. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 15 '12 at 3:25
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It's an attribute of the class, not the instance, and is created when the class is defined, not when it is instantiated.

Compare:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = {}
        print self.a
        self.filla()
    def filla(self):
        for i in range(10):
            self.a[str(i)] = i
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Any variable get set in _init_ method will be a 'local variable'.

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 'local' #this is a local varable

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.a
'local'
>>> Foo.a
AttributeError: type object 'Foo' has no attribute 'a'

Any variable outside of _init_ method will be a 'static variable'.

class Foo(object):
    a = 'static' #this is a static varable
    def __init__(self):
        #any code except 'set value to a'

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.a
'static'
>>> Foo.a
'static'

If you want define 'local variable' and 'static variable'

class Foo(object):
    a = 'static' #this is a static varable
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 'local' #this is a local variable

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.a
'local'
>>> Foo.a
'static'

To access static value inside _init_ method, using self._class_.a

class Foo(object):
    a = 'static' #this is a static varable
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 'local' #this is a local variable
        self.__class__.a = 'new static' #access static value

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.a
'local'
>>> Foo.a
'new static'
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