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I have a test file in which I stub the dependencies (repositories mainly) of my tested class. Example of repository stubbed (shortened from about 200 lines):

internal class doerRepository : IDoerRepository
{
    public IQueryable<Doer> ActiveDoers
    {
        get
        {
            Account account = new Account();
        //Property setting for account

        Zone zone = new Zone();
        //Property setting for zone

        Doer doer = new Doer();
        doer.Zone = doerZone;
        doer.Account = doerAccount;

        var list = new List<Doer>();
        list.Add(doer);
        return list.AsQueryable();
    }
 }

}

And a test method looks like this:

[Test]
public void IsValidDoer_DoerIsValid()
{
    var doerValidation = new DoerValidation(new doerRepository());
    //Assert things
}

The problem is that this entity environment (it stubs about half of the database) is my baseline. I have about 25 tests to make for this test file. For each test, I have to slightly change the stub (try with an invalid zone, an invalid account, etc.). I end up copy pasting the 200 lines to change one little thing (and I have to rename the class over that).

Is it possible to reuse the stub code and just make the relevant changes? I tried this, but the value I change is not updated

internal class doerRepository2 : IDoerRepository
{
    public IQueryable<Doer> ActiveDoers
    {
        get
        { List<Doer> list = new doerRepository().ActiveDoers.ToList();
          list.First().Account = new Account();
          return list.AsQueryable();
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can avoid writing stubs by hand by using some isolation framework. It allows one to dynamically created stubs. I personally prefer Moq. With it your test can be written this way.

[Test]
public void IsValidDoer_DoerIsValid()
{
  var mockRepository = new Mock<IDoerRepository>();
  var activeDoers = CreateSpecificDoerList();
  mockRepository.Setup(r => r.ActiveDoers).Returns(activeDoers);

  var doerValidation = new DoerValidation(mockRepository.Object);

  // Assert things
}

Here you're creating a dynamic stub and telling it that ActiveDoers should return your specific list of doers.

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Awsome, that helps! –  Mathieu Mar 15 '12 at 3:43
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I tend to solve this by adding extra setter properties on my stubs to be able to set values I return in the stub methods that return the mock data to support the method under test.

This way I usually get away with just one stub since I can re-purpose it by setting different combinations of data to be returned.

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Yes, this may also add flexibility! –  Mathieu Mar 15 '12 at 11:19
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