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What's the correct name for the "arrow" syntax in PHP, used when referencing an object, e.g.

$this->value = "test";

What's the "->" really called? One of those "really-hard-to-google" terms.

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It's just a kind of syntax, does it have a name? –  xdazz Mar 15 '12 at 3:50
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minus greater than –  SiGanteng Mar 15 '12 at 3:53
    
Good see there's as much confusion as I was expecting. I think I'll stick with "arrow" colloquially though! –  mattdwen Mar 15 '12 at 4:01
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

T_OBJECT_OPERATOR

...but everyone calls it an arrow.


Hint: run this in the PHP CLI: ->;

Extra credit: now what's :: called?

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T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM :P –  mattdwen Mar 15 '12 at 4:00
    
heh... at least that's easier to google for than ::, isn't it (eventually you find "scope resolution operator" for that one). –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 15 '12 at 4:05
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Good Question. The "->" is called an Arrow Operator.

References: http://ch2.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php

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As far as I know it is referred to as a Single Arrow Operator, whereas the => is the Double Arrow Operator!

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dynamic data access operatore ( -> ) static data access operatore ( :: )

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