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I have a code to the following scheme:

class First s where
  func1 :: s -> s
class Second a where
  func2 :: s -> a s

data D s = D {value :: s}
myFunc2 :: First s => s -> D s
myFunc2 = undefined

In common func2's argument could not be instance of First. I want to make D instance of Second in only that cases when it's value instance of First. Then I want to get this instance:

instance Second D where
  func2 = myFunc2

But I get an error:

No instance for (First s)
  arising from a use of `myFunc2'

Okay, let instance be:

instance First s => Second D where
  func2 = myFunc2

But this gives error:

Ambiguous constraint `First s'
  At least one of the forall'd type variables mentioned by the constraint
  must be reachable from the type after the '=>'
In the instance declaration for `Second D'

So, is there a way to get instance of class with some conditions from other classes, but without all type variables after '=>'?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think it helps to think about what is meant qualitatively by

class Second a where
    func2 :: s -> a s

A Second instance promises that func2 is defined for any type s. But that's not true of myFunc2, because myFunc2 is only defined for those s for which there exists a First instance. This means that as you have defined First and Second, it is not possible to use myFunc2 in a Second instance (unless there existed a catch-all forall s . First s instance, but I'm assuming not, or you wouldn't have bothered to make a typeclass).

So, you will have to change at least one thing. You could redefine Second as Grzegorz suggested. If you don't like that, you could redefine Second like

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-}
{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}

class Second a s where
  func2 :: s -> a s

instance First s => Second D s where
  func2 = myFunc2

Note that this is saying something different than what you wrote originally, because now a Second instance does not guarantee that func2 is polymorphic. But I think this is closer to what you mean when you say "make D instance of Second in only that cases when it's value instance of First". Maybe it will be acceptable in your code.

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Thanks, this looks like the best what can I do with. –  spontaliku Mar 15 '12 at 12:54

The exact solution will depend on what the code is trying to do, but the problem is that the type signature you give to func2 does not mention the First s constraint, whereas your definition of func2 for the Second D instance needs it. The following compiles:

class First s where
  func1 :: s -> s
class Second a where
  func2 :: First s => s -> a s

data D s = D {value :: s}
myFunc2 :: First s => s -> D s
myFunc2 = undefined

instance Second D where
  func2 = myFunc2
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is func2's arguments could not be instance of First in common. I want to make D instance of Second in only that cases when it's value instance of First. I corrected question. –  spontaliku Mar 15 '12 at 7:59

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