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I'm using Unity as my DI Container and I haven't been able to get it to work when resolving my SignalR hubs. Has anyone had success with this? I've tried the following:

    public class UnityDependencyResolver : DefaultDependencyResolver
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _Container;



     public UnityDependencyResolver (IUnityContainer container)
            {
                _Container = container;
                //edit to add
                container.RegisterInstance<IJavaScriptMinifier>(NullJavaScriptMinifier.Instance);

            }

        public override object GetService(Type serviceType)
        {
            return base.GetService(serviceType) ?? _Container.Resolve(serviceType);
        }

        public override IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
        {
            return base.GetServices(serviceType) ?? _Container.ResolveAll(serviceType);
        }

    }

but I'm getting an error indicating it can't resolve SignalR.Infrastructure.IJavaScriptMinifier

share|improve this question
    
Did you register in implementation of IJavaScriptMinifier with Unity? –  Sebastian Weber Mar 15 '12 at 8:37
    
I tried that after I posted this but it felt like a hack. (I'll edit the post to show how). I'm not using explicitly using it and it's a SignalR interface. –  timDunham Mar 15 '12 at 12:52
    
Maybe you don't explicitely use it in your application. But if your infrastructure depends on it and SignalR uses the DependencyResolver to get an implementation of the IJavaScriptMinifier you need to register it in your container. I would not register it inside the constructor of the resolver but together with all your other dependencies in the application root of your app. –  Sebastian Weber Mar 15 '12 at 13:35
    
SignalR needs a lot of things and the DefaultDependencyResolver includes those (e.g IHubLocator, IHubFactory, and many others). I don't have to register those. I'm thinking it may just be a bug. I really appreciate your comments though :) –  timDunham Mar 15 '12 at 14:22
    
Sorry I overlooked that you only use Unity as a fallback when the DefaultDependencyResolver is not able to serve a given service. Is there any kind of Initialize routine in the default resolver that does not get called by your custom resolver? –  Sebastian Weber Mar 15 '12 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

I am a little confused as to why you try to do the base resolution first and then the unity resolver second. Typically if you are going to replace base implementations with your own, both will resolve but yours should be first so that an instance of your overriding class is returned. For instance, say you want to override the IConnectionIdFactory in SignalR. You could create your own class that inherits from the given interface and then register it with Unity. Then your dependency resolver should be able to resolve the given dependency and return, never touching the SignalR resolver. I put together a little test application and my dependency resolver looks like this:

Dependancy Resolver:

public class UnityResolver : DefaultDependencyResolver
{
    private readonly IUnityContainer _container;
    public UnityResolver(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        _container = container;
    }

    public override object GetService(Type serviceType)
    {
        if (_container.IsRegistered(serviceType))
        {
            return _container.Resolve(serviceType);
        }
        return base.GetService(serviceType);
    }

    public override IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
    {
        if (_container.IsRegistered(serviceType))
        {
            return _container.ResolveAll(serviceType);
        }
        return base.GetServices(serviceType);
    }
}

It is important with unity to test whether or not we have a resolution path as Resolve will throw an exception if one does not exist.

For completeness sake here is the implementation:

ConnectionIDFactory:

public class ConnectionIdFactory : IConnectionIdFactory
{                
    public string CreateConnectionId(IRequest request)
    {            
        return Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }
}

Registration:

public class Bootstrapper
{
    public static void Pre_Start()
    {
        Container.DefaultContainer.Instance.RegisterType(
            typeof(IConnectionIdFactory), 
            typeof(Repositories.ConnectionIdFactory), 
            null, 
            new Microsoft.Practices.Unity.ContainerControlledLifetimeManager());

        AspNetHost.SetResolver(new Resolvers.UnityResolver(Container.DefaultContainer.Instance));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I originally was checking my container first, then the base class but kept running into the IJavaScriptMinifier error that I mentioned. I thought it may have something to do with Unity as the sample (using Ninject) seemed to work. In the end I'm thinking this may be a bug in SignalR. –  timDunham Mar 19 '12 at 2:22
    
@timDunham no, it is not a bug in signalR, if it cannot be resolved just return null and SignalR will do the right thing. The error you are seeing is from Unity, not from SignalR. As mentioned, Unity will throw an exception on a call to resolve for a service that isn't registered. –  Gary.S Mar 19 '12 at 3:38

Yesterday i solved this issue in the following way:

Registering the container:

    AspNetHost.SetResolver(dependencyResolver);
    DependencyResolver.SetResolver(dependencyResolver);

Resolver:

    public class UnityDependencyResolver : DefaultDependencyResolver, IDependencyResolver
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

        public UnityDependencyResolver(IUnityContainer container)
        {
            _container = container;
        }

        #region IDependencyResolver Members

        public override object GetService(Type serviceType)
        {
            try
            {
                return _container.Resolve(serviceType);
            }
            catch
            {
                return base.GetService(serviceType);
            }
        }

        public override IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
        {
            try
            {
                return _container.ResolveAll(serviceType);
            }
            catch
            {
                return base.GetServices(serviceType);
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }

Hub:

    public class Chat : Hub
    {
        [Dependency]
        public UserService _userService { get; set; }

        public void Send(string message)
        {                
            _userService.SomeMethod();                
        }
    }

Works perfectly!

share|improve this answer
1  
Using a catch all to catch resolve exceptions is bad and will slow performance, much better to determine if resolution is possible first with an if. –  Gary.S Mar 26 '12 at 10:14
    
Thanks for the suggestion Jan. I'll try this out tonight and give you feedback. –  timDunham Mar 26 '12 at 23:36
    
Gary.S -> Correct. Thanx for the note. –  Jan Saladukha Mar 30 '12 at 21:29

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