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class Foo {
   private $_id;
   public function __construct (){
     $this->_id = /*requesting variable name*/;
   }
}
$bar = NEW Foo();

I'm trying to set the $bar->_id equal to 'bar'

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1. Please edit you post so it would look like a question. 2. As $_id is private, you cannot access it directly. Use getter method which returns you the value of your $_id. –  Roman Newaza Mar 15 '12 at 5:28
1  
The class construct is accessing the $_id. It is not being accessed directly. –  Matthew Sprankle Mar 15 '12 at 5:32
    
You just set value in constructor, but you need to get this value outside the object. As constructor doesn't return a value, use aforementioned solution. –  Roman Newaza Mar 15 '12 at 5:38
    
...stop being nit-picky for an example. –  Matthew Sprankle Mar 15 '12 at 5:42
    
sorry, what do you mean? –  Roman Newaza Mar 15 '12 at 5:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class Foo {

   private $_id;

   public function __construct($id) {
     $this->_id = $id;
   }

}

$bar = new Foo('bar');

There's no other sane way to do this.

An object is the object. It has no relationship to the variable it's assigned to. You cannot get the name of the variable the object has been assigned to inside the object. Consider that an object may not be assigned to a variable at all, or it may be assigned to several variables at the same time, or the variable it's assigned to may change.

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You can't get the variable name the object is being assigned to, short of parsing the PHP code of the line calling the script. Which, while possible, is evil and difficult enough that it's not worth doing.

Consider that $bar = new Foo(); does the following things:

  1. Creates a new Foo; and
  2. Assigns a reference to it to $bar.

You can think about those steps happening in that order -- which is to say that at the time Foo's constructor is running, you don't even know what's going to happen to that Foo you're creating. That's a good thing, in the long run. Imagine if every function changed how it behaved depending on how and where it was called. Testability alone would be a nightmare.

Short version: don't bother. There is undoubtedly a less evil way of doing what you want to do. What that way will be, depends on what problem you're actually trying to solve by doing this.

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If the idea is to instantiate the object with arbitrary properties, you can do

public function __construct(array $properties)
{
    foreach($properties as $property => $value) {
        $this->$property = $value
    }
}
$foo = new Foo(array('prop1' => 1, 'prop2' => 2));

Add variations as you see fit. For instance, add checks to property_exists to only allow setting of defined members. I find throwing random properties at objects a design flaw.

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You just set value in constructor, but you need to get this value outside the object. As constructor doesn't return a value, use getter solution.

class Foo {

    private $_id;

    public function __construct() {

        $this->_id = 'Foo';

    }

    public function getId() {
        // Because $_id is class member, you can access it like this:
        return $this->_id;

    }

}

$bar = NEW Foo();

echo $bar->getId();
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