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I'm not too familiar with Java and need some help with an enumeration lookup (I think that's what it's called?) I have many years of C experience, so I know what I'm trying to accomplish using C, but I don't know the equivalent syntax or construct in Java.

I don't have a C environment on this computer, so the syntax might be off, but this is what I'm trying to accomplish:

typedef enum regions_t {
     REGION_CALIFORNIA,
     REGION_HAWAII,
     REGION_LOUISIANA,
     REGION_NUM_REGIONS
} regions_t;

typedef struct regionData_t {
    regions_t regionName;
    char_t[50] url;
    int32_t population;
 } regionData_t;

 regionData_t myRegions[REGION_NUM_REGIONS] {
     {REGION_CALIFORNIA, "http://http://california.gov/", 10123321},
     {REGION_HAWAII, "http://hawaii.gov", 5123321},
     {REGION_LOUISIANA, "http://louisiana.gov/", 8123321}
 }

This way, I can access, for example, the url data in this fashion, which is easy to read and easy to expand upon:

myRegions[REGION_HAWAII].url

How do I accomplish the same idea in Java?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quick and dirty:

public enum Region {
    CALIFORNIA, HAWAII, LOUISIANA
}

public class RegionData {
    public final Region region;
    public final String url;
    public final int population;
    public RegionData(Region region, String url, int population) {
        this.region = region;
        this.url = url;
        this.popuplation = population;
    }
}

…

Map<Region, RegionData> regionData = new HashMap<Region, RegionData>();
regionData.put(Region.CALIFORNIA, new RegionData(Region.CALIFORNIA, "http://http://california.gov/", 10123321));
…

System.out.println(regionData.get(Region.CALIFORNIA).url);

But you can also use the fact that enums in Java are normal classes, too.

public enum Region {
    CALIFORNIA("http://http://california.gov/", 10123321),
    HAWAII("http://hawaii.gov", 5123321),
    LOUISIANA("http://louisiana.gov/", 8123321);
    public final String url;
    public final int population;
    private Region(String url, int population) {
        this.url = url;
        this.population;
    }
}

…

System.out.println(Region.CALIFORNIA.url);
share|improve this answer
    
Accepted, as it duplicates the functionality I was looking for closest. Thanks. –  Jeff Lamb Mar 15 '12 at 6:02
    
You should use an EnumMap instead of HashMap in this case. –  Axel Mar 15 '12 at 7:23

I suspect you need something like this:

public enum Region {
    CALIFORNIA("california-url", 1),
    HAWAII("hawaii-url", 2),
    LOUISIANA("louisiana-url", 3);

    private String url;
    private int population;

    private Region(String url, int population) {
        this.url = url;
        this.population = population;
    }

    public int getPopulation() {
        return population;
    }

    public String url() {
        return url;
    }
}

Notice that the String url should probably come from an external resource.

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Note, in Java, enum members are objects, and as such can contain properties. Which is to say, you can say Region.CALIFORNIA.url() (or even Region r = Region.CALIFORNIA; String url = r.url(); rather than having to have a map of enums to properties if you use this method. +1 –  cHao Mar 15 '12 at 5:48

Java has enums also with slightly different syntax, but instead of a struct you'll want to encapsulate all of this information in a class. I am listing as direct of a translation as I can:

public enum Region
{
    REGION_CALIFORNIA,
    REGION_HAWAII,
    REGION_LOUISIANA;
}

public class RegionData
{
   Region region;
   String url;
   int    population;

   public RegionData(Region region, String url, int population)
   {
      this.region     = region;
      this.url        = url;
      this.population = population;
   }
}

Then you would want to look into the HashMap of HashTable classes to get the lookup functionality you want:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/HashMap.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Hashtable.html

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Enums in Java are actually Classes. So you can do whatever you like with them except a few things like object instantiation at runtime.

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For a small number of known values, I would do :

enum RegionData { 

    CALIFORNIA() {
        @Override
        public String getUrl() {
            return "http://barfoo.com";
        }

        @Override
        public int getPopulation() {
            return 1000;
        }
    };

    LOUSIANA() {
        @Override
        public String getPopulation() {
            return "http://fubar.com";
        }

        @Override
        public int getPopulation() {
            return 9000;
        }
    };  

    public abstract String getUrl();
    public abstract int getPopulation();

}
share|improve this answer
    
downvoter care to comment? –  Amir Afghani Mar 15 '12 at 5:51
    
I didn't downvote, but if i did, it would be because this is way more complicated than it has to be. You don't need whole methods for each member; you can just pass properties to a constructor. See Renato's answer. –  cHao Mar 15 '12 at 5:54
    
Did you see how i qualified my answer with: For a small set of known values ? –  Amir Afghani Mar 15 '12 at 5:55
1  
Doesn't matter. For a small set of known values, the difference is noticeable. For a huge number, it's simply onerous. 3/4 of the lines of code in your example are no more than syntax, and the number of lines of overhead increases linearly with the number of enum members. Add to that how much code you'll have to add if you ever add another property to this enum. This solution simply can't scale. –  cHao Mar 15 '12 at 6:01
1  
a) It doesn’t compile because there are two errors in it. b) Stop crying about downvotes. –  Bombe Mar 15 '12 at 6:09

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