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After creating a handful of functions for my new website, I quickly realized things were getting out of hand with all the include files using perpetual programming, so I decided to learn and convert my currently written functions into OOP classes and convert from mysql to mysqli. Hasn't been too bad of a transition so far but I've reached a function that has/needs multiple queries, one a SELECT to check the data before I UPDATE it. What I've written so far, using a prepared statement, works like a charm but it only does the SELECT. Where I'm stuck is where it comes time to UPDATE the db. Here's what I have so far:

public function ban() {
  $connection  = Database::getConnection();
  $user_id = $_POST['user'];
  $feedback = '';
  $query = "SELECT banned, user_name
            FROM users
            WHERE user_id = ?";
  $stmt = $connection -> prepare($query);

  // Check for a multi-user selection on POST
  if (count($user_id) > 1) {
     foreach ($user_id as $value) {
        $stmt -> bind_param('i', $value);
        if (!$result = $stmt -> execute()) {
           $feedback .= "Did not execute.";
        } else {
           $stmt -> bind_result($banned, $user);
           $stmt -> fetch();
           if ($banned == 1) {
              $feedback .= $user . " is already banned.<br />";
           } else {
              // This is where I need the code to update the database
              // with the users who aren't already banned.
           }
        }
     }
     $stmt -> close();
     return $feedback;
  } else {
     // This is where the UPDATE will be for a single person ban
     // if only one was selected on POST
  } 
}

Can I create/execute a second prepared statement for the UPDATE injection, running that inside another loop in the section I need the code or would it be best to avoid that, or would that even work? I'm sure a mysqli_multi_query is probably the best way to go, having to rewrite the function again, since I found out (after writing this much of the function) that you can't use a prepared statement with a multi_query injection. Rewriting isn't a big deal but the help for using multi_query is far and few between. PHP website has a lot of documentation but lets be honest, it's pretty darn confusing.

The UPDATE query would look something like this:

$explain = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['banExplain']);
UPDATE users
SET banned = '1', ban_reason = '$explain'
WHERE user_id = '$value'"

ANY help with this would be greatly appreciated. Hope I explained well enough with what I need to do. If not, let me know. THANKS!

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code sample is still very procedural.

You should have a method to check if a user is user_banned and a method to ban_user a user.

The user_banned method should take a user_id and return a boolean.

The ban_user method should take a reason and user_id.

There should be another function or method which does the loop.

Cast the user_id as an array and you can do one loop.

Use exceptions to handle errors.

<?php
    //the model
    ...  

    public function update_users (array $user_ids)
    {
       $result = array();         

       foreach ($user_ids as $user_id) {
           if (!$this->user_banned($user_id)) {
               $this->ban_user($user_id, $reason);

           } else {
               $result[$user_id] = "already banned";
           }

        return $result;
    }
    ...

    //the controller

    //prevent XSS, cast as integers or use filter_var or something
    $user_ids = sanitize((array) $_POST['user']);
    try {
        $result = $obj->update_users($user_ids);
    } catch (Exception $e) {
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Your right, the code is still very procedural. After posting the question, I came up with a solution, albeit not a more OOP style just a lengthier version (see my answer reply.) It works however. I will take your advice now though and see if I can break it down into smaller, more OOP style functions. –  JT Smith Mar 16 '12 at 0:48
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As I re-read my question it got me thinking about using a second prepared statement for the update. First, I tried to include the second statement within the initial foreach loop but that errored out, presumably because you can't have more than 1 statement open at a time. What I decided next was to store the value (the user_id being checked) on each iteration into a seperate array then, after closing the initial foreach loop and prepared statement, I ran a second loop using the new prepared statement for the UPDATE and voila! Here is the code as it looks now:

public function ban() {
  $connection  = Database::getConnection();
  $user_id = $_POST['user'];
  $reason = $_POST['banExplain'];
  $update = array();
  $feedback = '';
  $query = "SELECT banned, user_name
            FROM users
            WHERE user_id = ?";
  $query2 = "UPDATE users
             SET banned = '1', ban_reason = ?
             WHERE user_id = ?";
  $stmt = $connection -> prepare($query);
  $stmt2 = $connection -> prepare($query2);

  if (count($user_id) > 1) {
     foreach ($user_id as $value) {
        $stmt -> bind_param('i', $value);            
        if (!$result = $stmt -> execute()) {
           $feedback .= "Did not execute search.<br />";
        } else {
           $stmt -> bind_result($banned, $user);
           $stmt -> fetch();
           if ($banned == 1) {
              $feedback .= $user . " is already banned.<br />";
           } else {
              $update["$user"] = $value; // Populate an array to pass to update loop
           }
        }
     }
     $stmt -> close();

     // Run update query - $key from $update var is the user name
     foreach ($update as $key => $value) {
        $stmt2 -> bind_param('si', $reason, $value);
        if (!$result2 = $stmt2 -> execute()){
           $feedback .="Did not execute update.<br />";
        } else {
           $feedback .= $key . " is banned.<br />";
        }
     }
     $stmt2 -> close();
     return $feedback;
  } else {

     // Executes for single selection requests
     $stmt -> bind_param('i', $user_id);
     if (!$result = $stmt -> execute()) {
        $feedback .= "Did not execute search.<br />";
     } else {
        $stmt -> bind_result($banned, $user);
        $stmt -> fetch();
        if ($banned == 1) {
           $feedback .= $user . " is already banned.<br />";
        } else {
           $update["$user"] = $user_id;
        }
     }
     $stmt -> close();
     // Runs loop simply for the user name in the $key var
     foreach ($update as $key => $value) {
        $stmt2 -> bind_param('si', $reason, $value);
        if (!$result2 = $stmt2 -> execute()){
           $feedback .="Did not execute update.<br />";
        } else {
           $feedback .= $key . " is banned.<br />";
        }
     }
     $stmt2 -> close();
     return $feedback;
  }

}

Rather lengthy for what seems to be such a simple task, and I'm thinking that the mysqli::multi_query is probably still the best way to go about this (after using mysqli::real_escape to add the needed security) but other than the bulkiness of this function, it works and it's safe (from what I can tell) while keeping the server request cost to a minimum.

I'm going to take user934258's advice now and try to break this into smaller, easier to digest and maintain class functions. If/when I complete that, I will followup here to show the results which will hopefully help others out in the same predicament. If anyone else has some good solutions, please let me know. I'm always trying to improve my coding

Thanks everyone, hope this at least helps someone else in the same situation.


Alright well, thanks to user934258 I went back and re-examined the coding of this/these methods. By taking his advice I was able to cut about 25 lines of code from the banning method(s). But, with only a couple additional lines, and passing/injecting an extra argument I was able to make the code multi-purpose to incorporate the unban method which in turn removes about 77 lines of unneeded repetitive code (the unban was a mirror copy of the ban except it checked for a Zero instead of a One in the DB, and displayed a slightly different response.) For those of you in the future who may find this topic helpful, here is the final product of my code.

Method called from script:

public function ban($arg) {              // 0 = Unban 1 = Ban
  $this -> user_id = $_POST['user'];     // initially set user id as global variable
  $user_id = $this -> user_id;
  $this -> banReason = mysqli_real_escape_string($_POST['banExplain']);

  if (!$this -> check_ban($user_id, $arg)) {
     $this -> feedback .= Admin::CONNFAIL;
     return $this -> feedback;           // Returned connection failure on select
  } elseif (!$this -> ban_user($arg)) {
     $this -> feedback .= Admin::UPFAIL;
     return $this -> feedback;           // Returned connection failure on update
  } else {
     return $this -> feedback;
  }
}

Method to check DB ban value(s):

private function check_ban($user_id, $arg) {
  $connection = Database::getConnection();
  $query = "SELECT banned, user_name
            FROM users
            WHERE user_id = ?";
  $stmt = $connection -> prepare($query);

  foreach ($user_id as $value) {
     $stmt -> bind_param('i', $value);
     if (!$result = $stmt -> execute()) {
        return FALSE;
     } else {
        $stmt -> bind_result($banned, $user);
        $stmt -> fetch();
        if ($arg == 1 && $banned == 1) {
           $this -> feedback .= $user . " is already banned.<br />";
        } elseif ($arg == 0 && $banned == 0) {
           $this -> feedback .= $user . " is not currently banned.<br />";
        } else {
           $this -> update["$user"] = $value;  // Populate array to be un/banned
        }
     }
  }
  $stmt -> close();
  return TRUE;
}

And finally the method to Update the DB with the un/ban:

private function ban_user($arg) {
  $connection = Database::getConnection();
  $update = $this -> update;
  $reason = $this -> banReason;
  $query = "UPDATE users
            SET banned = ?, ban_reason = ?
            WHERE user_id = ?";
  $stmt = $connection -> prepare($query);

  foreach ($update as $key => $value) {
     $stmt -> bind_param('isi', $arg, $reason, $value);
     if (!$result = $stmt -> execute()) {
        return FALSE;
     } elseif ($arg == 0) {
        $this -> feedback .= $key . " is unbanned.<br />";
     } else {
        $this -> feedback .= $key . " is banned.<br />";
     }
  }
  $stmt -> close();
  return TRUE;
}

Note that very little error checking/filtering/sanitizing is occurring in these methods. I have a couple reasons for this: Values of variables are checked in the script, I am the only one granted rights to do this, and the values for the vars like $user_id are pre-populated into checkboxes and drop-down lists with the exact values from the db so chances of a wrong $user_id is slim to none.

As I mentioned in the other posts, if anyone can offer a better solution to what I've done then please let me know.

Thanks for such a great community!

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