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Many times when creating a grammatical list (with comas), I use similar code to the following:

std::stringstream list;
int i = 0;
for (auto itemListIt = itemList.begin(); itemListIt != itemList.end(); itemListIt++)
{
    list << *itemListIt;
    if (i < itemList.size() - 1) list << ", ";
    i++;
}

Is there some more concise way do this, perhaps without the extra variable - 'i'?

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possible duplicate of Printing lists with commas C++ –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '12 at 9:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not test what you're really interested in; "Is there another element after this one?".

std::stringstream list;
for (auto it = roomList.begin(); it != itemList.end(); it++)
{
    list << *it;
    if ( it+1 != itemList.end() ) list << ", ";
}
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I though 'it' pointed to the element in the vector. Won't 'it+1' just add 1 to the address? –  d-_-b Mar 15 '12 at 7:39
1  
Yes, 'it' does point to the element in the vector. but 'it+1' won't add 1 to the address because 'it' is not a C++ pointer. It's an iterator and incrementing an iterator makes it point to the next element. (Not everything that points to something is a regular pointer. Iterators point to things, but they're not normal pointers.) –  David Schwartz Mar 15 '12 at 7:41
    
Another alternative is to output the comma before each item, except the first which is easy to deduce. –  Retired Ninja Mar 15 '12 at 7:50
    
@DavidSchwartz, I thought only increment and decrement operators existed for c++ iterators. I guess it depends on the iterator. –  d-_-b Mar 15 '12 at 8:00
1  
@JamesKanze: It will still work. Since adding one to a T* makes it point to the next T and vectors are contiguous in memory. –  David Schwartz Mar 15 '12 at 9:27

There are two simple solutions for this. The first is to use a while loop:

auto itemListIt = itemList.begin();
while ( itemListIt != itemList.end() ) {
    list << *itemListIt;
    ++ itemListIt;
    if ( itemListIt != itemList.end() ) {
        list << ", ";
    }
}

The second solution is to change the logic slightly: instead of appending a ", " if there is more to follow, prefix one if you're not the first element:

for ( auto itemListIt = itemList.begin(); itemListIt != itemList.end(); ++ itemListIt ) {
    if ( itemListIt != itemList.begin() ) {
        list << ", ";
    }
    list << *itemListIt;
}
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You can loop over everything up to the next to last using --items.end().

Then output the last one using items.back().

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::ostringstream oss;

    std::vector<int> items;
    items.push_back(1);
    items.push_back(1);
    items.push_back(2);
    items.push_back(3);
    items.push_back(5);
    items.push_back(8);

    if(items.size() > 1)
    {
        std::copy(items.begin(), --items.end(),
                  std::ostream_iterator<int>(oss, ", "));
        oss << "and ";
    }
    // else do nothing

    oss << items.back();

    std::cout << oss.str();
}

Output:

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8

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I wonder whether I can use rend() instead of end()-- –  Peter Wood Mar 15 '12 at 10:32
    
I don't think that post-decrementing the result of items.end() does what you think anyway. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '12 at 11:43
    
@SteveJessop Updated and to pre-increment and tested, thanks. –  Peter Wood Mar 15 '12 at 12:57

The following will work with any InputIterator input:

std::stringstream list;
auto it(std::begin(input)); //Or however you get the input
auto end(std::end(input));
bool first(true);
for (; it != end; ++it)
{
    if (!first) list << ", ";
    else first = false;
    list << *it;
}

Or without an extra variable:

std::stringstream list;
auto it(std::begin(input)); //Or however you get the input
auto end(std::end(input));
if (it != end)
{
    list << *it;
    ++it;
}
for (; it != end; ++it)
{
    list << ", " << *it;
}
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It still has an extra the variable - first –  d-_-b Mar 20 '12 at 1:54
    
@doobie: Yeah, I guess this doesn't really answer the question. That said, it is not possible to do this without an extra variable or duplicate code (for input iterators). I've added the "duplicate code" version. –  Mankarse Mar 20 '12 at 3:11
    
Take a look at the other answers... –  d-_-b Mar 20 '12 at 23:43
    
@doobie: Ugh, I am stupid :$. James Kanze's answer is also a valid way to do this. –  Mankarse Mar 20 '12 at 23:51
    
There is always something new to learn! ;) –  d-_-b Mar 21 '12 at 2:14

And if you want to do that with a map or other iterators that cannot do random access, as others have suggested, check for the first element:

std::stringstream query;
query << "select id from dueShipments where package in (";
for (auto it = packageList.begin(); it != packageList.end(); it++)
{
    if (it != packageList.begin()) query << ", ";
    query << it->second;
}
query << ")";
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