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I've made an MethodRule and @Rule-annotation to make my test-life a bit easier. It checks if a specific exception had been thrown and checks if the exception-message equals or contains the given message.

Now when i run a testmethod with more lines to test, it only takes the first line and than is ready. How do I make so all my lines in the testmethod are tested?

This is my code: Annotation:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target({ElementType.METHOD})
public @interface ExpectedDomeinValidatieMessage {
    String value() default "";
    String contains() default "";
}

MethodRule:

@Override
public Statement apply(final Statement base, final FrameworkMethod method, final Object target) {
return new Statement() {

  @Override
  public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
    ExpectedDomeinValidatieMessage message = method.getAnnotation(ExpectedDomeinValidatieMessage.class);
    if (message == null) {
      base.evaluate();
    } else {
      try {
        base.evaluate();
        Assert.fail("DomeinValidatieException not thrown");
      } catch (DomeinValidatieException e) {
        if (StringUtils.isNotBlank(message.value())) {
          if (!e.getMessage().equals(message.value())) {
            throwException(e, "", message.value(), e.getMessage());
          }
        }
        if (StringUtils.isNotBlank(message.contains())) {
          if (!e.getMessage().contains(message.contains())) {
            throwException(e, "Segment niet gevonden:", message.contains(), e.getMessage());
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }

  private void throwException(Throwable exception, String message, String expected, String actual) {
    ComparisonFailure cf = new ComparisonFailure(message, expected, actual);
    cf.setStackTrace(exception.getStackTrace());
    throw cf;
  }
};

Usage:

@Test
@ExpectedDomeinValidatieMessage("[Werkzaamheden] WerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen niet gevuld")
public void valideerWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen() throws DomeinValidatieException {
    aanvraag.getVerzekerde().getWerkzaamheden().setWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen(null);
    validator.valideer();
}

If I use it like this, it only tests the first test in the method:

@Test
@ExpectedDomeinValidatieMessage("[Werkzaamheden] WerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen niet gevuld")
public void valideerWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen() throws DomeinValidatieException {
    aanvraag.getVerzekerde().getWerkzaamheden().setWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen(null);
    validator.valideer(); //Only this one is tested
    aanvraag.getVerzekerde().getWerkzaamheden().setWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen("bla");
    validator.valideer(); //This is NOT tested
}
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2 Answers 2

Run the code through a debugger. My guess is that the first call to valideer() does indeed throw an exception even though you don't expect it.

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Aaron I think you're right. It does throw the DomeinValidatieException, as expected. So probably that's why is only take the first testable LoC. Now I have to find a way to supress the added error... –  Tom de Vroomen Mar 15 '12 at 9:12
    
Split it into two tests –  Aaron Digulla Mar 15 '12 at 10:09

The JUnit assertXXX methods work by throwing exceptions (specifically AssertionError). So when an exception is thrown (either by your code, or by an assert) control exits from the test method. There isn't any way to restart from the place where the exception is thrown.

You probably want Parameterized, which allows you to run the same tests multiple times with different parameters.

EDIT: I suspect that valideer() is throwing an Exception. To explain a bit further, let's paraphrase your code. When you define a rule, what you're effectively doing is the following:

try {
    base.evaluate(); // this calls valideerWerkzaamMetGevaarlijkeStoffen()
    Assert.fail("DomeinValidatieException not thrown");
} catch (DomeinValidatieException e) {
    // evaluate whether or not the test has failed or not
}

This means that if your first call to valideer() throws an Exception, then control is transferred to the catch block above. There isn't a chance to continue executing the test, because the control has passed elsewhere. You can pass/fail the test as much as you like, but control has passed to the catch block above.

By the way, MethodRule has been deprecated in the later versions, you should be using TestRule instead.

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Matthew, You describe the failure situation. Ofcourse it stops then, that's expected. But when the first test-line is oké, the second one isn't tested. –  Tom de Vroomen Mar 15 '12 at 8:28
    
Edited the answer to include a better explanation of what's going on. –  Matthew Farwell Mar 15 '12 at 9:20
    
I think I get it. Ofcourse it throws an exception and passed control. So I'm beyond the point of no return to make this not being recorded as an error. I'll have a look at the TestRule. –  Tom de Vroomen Mar 15 '12 at 10:27
    
You should probably be looking at parameterized. –  Matthew Farwell Mar 15 '12 at 11:37

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