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- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    NSUserDefaults *somet = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];

    NSMutableArray *anArr = [somet objectForKey:@"somedata"] ;

    NSLog(@"anArr::: %@",anArr);

}

-(IBAction)addsomething:(id)sender{

   if (something == nil) {
        array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    NSLog(@"textfieldvalue::: %@", textfield.text);

    [array addObject:textfield.text];

    NSUserDefaults *something = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];

    [something setObject:array forKey:@"somedata"];

    array = [something objectForKey:@"somedata"];

    NSLog(@"array:: %@", array);

}

Using the above code, I am trying to save data dynamically in NSMutableArray and then saving it in NSUserDefaults. But on retrieving it I am getting (null). Even data is not being saved in array.

How to save data properly?

EDITED:

2012-03-15 15:17:18.431 check[2686:40b] anArr::: (null)
2012-03-15 15:17:30.160 check[2686:40b] textfieldvalue::: a
2012-03-15 15:17:30.162 check[2686:40b] array::: (null)
share|improve this question
    
Where do you initialize array? Further, objectForKey: will not return a mutable array instance (NSMutableArray). –  Erik Aigner Mar 15 '12 at 8:05
    
Please check I have edited my question –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 8:07
    
Now it's even more confusing. Why check something for nil? It hasn't even been initialized yet. –  Erik Aigner Mar 15 '12 at 8:10
    
@iError, can u edit your question with GDB log???? –  Tirth Mar 15 '12 at 9:14
    
I have Edited my question:) –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 10:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

no offense, but your code is a big pile of crap.

  1. variables named something are not useful. Period.
  2. you have a variable named something in your local method. And you have a variable named something that is part of your class. The "local variables hides instance variable" warnings are there for a reason!
    Probably that is where all your problems come from. I think you don't really understand the concept of local variables. If that is the case you should read more about basic Objective-C stuff.
  3. You check if something is nil and then you don't change something but you allocate an array. Those two have nothing to do with each other. Don't write such code.

I fixed it for you:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    NSUserDefaults *userDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    NSArray *anArr = [userDefaults objectForKey:@"somedata"];
    NSLog(@"anArr::: %@",anArr);
}

-(IBAction)addsomething:(id)sender{
    NSMutableArray *array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    NSLog(@"textfieldvalue::: %@", textfield.text);
    [array addObject:textfield.text];
    NSUserDefaults *userDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    [userDefaults setObject:array forKey:@"somedata"];
    array = [userDefaults objectForKey:@"somedata"];

    // synchronize is only needed while debugging (when you use the stop button in Xcode)
    // you don't need this in production code. remove it for release
    [userDefaults synchronize];

    NSLog(@"array:: %@", array);
}

However, most likely you want to save objects to the array you got from userDefaults. That won't work with local variables!

You would use something like this. But don't copy that verbatim. Try to understand it, and read more about local variables.

NSUserDefaults *userDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
array = [[userDefaults objectForKey:@"somedata"] mutableCopy];
if (!array) {
    // create array if it doesn't exist in NSUserDefaults
    array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
}
NSLog(@"array in viewDidLoad: %@",array);



NSLog(@"textfieldvalue::: %@", textField.text);
[array addObject: textField.text];
NSUserDefaults *userDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
[userDefaults setObject:array forKey:@"somedata"];

// synchronize is only needed while debugging (when you use the stop button in Xcode)
// you don't need this in production code. remove it for release
[userDefaults synchronize];
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, Have tried you code but I am getting this result 2012-03-15 15:51:36.832 check[3025:40b] textfieldvalue::: a 2012-03-15 15:51:36.845 check[3025:40b] array:: (a) 2012-03-15 15:51:44.712 check[3025:40b] textfieldvalue::: b 2012-03-15 15:51:44.738 check[3025:40b] array:: (b) –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 10:54
    
it is replacing the previous element with the new one, not adding a new one. Like if "a" has inserted then array is array:: (a) then after that when we enter b, then the array should be array:: (a,b) but it gives array:: (b) –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 10:56
2  
read the second code block of my answer and try to understand what it does. It should do exactly this. Keep in mind: array is an instance variable, not a local variable. –  Matthias Bauch Mar 15 '12 at 10:59
    
Hey @Matthias Bauch thank you very much, its working. Also please refer me some book related to objective-c and iphone development easy to understand. thank you very much –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 11:02
    
bro can you take a look at this question too stackoverflow.com/questions/9702361/… –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 11:25

Try following code may be help u...

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
 [super viewDidLoad];
// Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

NSUserDefaults *somet = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];

NSMutableArray *anArr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
 anArr = [somet objectForKey:@"somedata"] ;
[somet synchronize];

NSLog(@"anArr::: %@",anArr);

}

-(IBAction)addsomething:(id)sender{

NSLog(@"textfieldvalue::: %@", textfield.text);
//Here u have to check array is in memory allocate or not 
[array addObject:textfield.text];

NSUserDefaults *something = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];

[something setObject:array forKey:@"somedata"];
[something synchronize];

array = [something objectForKey:@"somedata"];

NSLog(@"array:: %@", array);

}
share|improve this answer
    
You are allocating a nsmutable array, then assigning it a object, doesnt make sense –  Saqib Saud Mar 15 '12 at 8:18
    
still the same result, in NSLog(@"array:: %@", array); it says (nul) –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 8:22
    
Question is edited now –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 10:20

You need to call [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] synchronize]; after you setObject:forKey.

[something setObject:array forKey:@"somedata"];
[something synchronize];
share|improve this answer
    
Tried it but still array is null :( –  Omer Waqas Khan Mar 15 '12 at 8:42

add this line ,

[something synchronize]

before retrieving data.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry that you are now the target for my rant about synchronize-fetishism. synchronize is generally not necessary! It is bad for performance because you force NSUserDefaults to write the whole plist of settings to the file system. Apple implemented NSUserDefaults so that it knows when it has to write its settings (i.e. when the app goes into background or quits). synchronize might be okay while debugging, when you occasionally force stop the app with the Xcode stop button. But experience shows that such code is never removed for release because "it works". –  Matthias Bauch Mar 15 '12 at 10:55
    
Conclusion: Don't put a [userDefaults synchronize]; after every call that changes NSUserDefaults. NSUserDefaults is smart! It is cached in memory and only written to disk when it's necessary. –  Matthias Bauch Mar 15 '12 at 10:56
    
@MatthiasBauch. Very Insightful.First of all Thank you for the comment. I solved similar problem with synchronize but didn realise it is heavy. I will keep that in mind. –  Vignesh Mar 15 '12 at 11:47

try this when you are saving value into NSUserDefaults

- (void)savingObject:(NSString *)keyName data:(id)val
{
    NSData *dataVal = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject:val];
    [defaults setObject:dataVal forKey:keyName];
    [defaults synchronize];
}

and then when you want to get that use this

- (id)gettingObject:(NSString *)keyName
{
    NSData *data = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:keyName];
    return [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data];
}

i think this helps you

share|improve this answer
    
no need to do this for saving NSStrings (like textField.text). NSStrings is an plist style attribute and can be saved directly to NSUserDefaults –  Matthias Bauch Mar 15 '12 at 10:50
    
yeah i know but he is adding NSMutableArray to NSUserDefaults so that is suggest him to do this. –  hchouhan02 Mar 15 '12 at 12:25

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