Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Many functions of a library I use return generators instead of lists when the result is some collection.

Sometimes I just want to check if the result is empty of not, and of course I can't write something like:

   result = return_generator()
   if result:
      print 'Yes, the generator did generate something!'

Now I come up with a one-liner that solve this problem without consuming the generator:

   result = return_generator()
   if zip("_", result):
      print 'Yes, the generator did generate something!'

I wonder if there are cleaner ways to solve this problem in one line?

share|improve this question
    
sigh I'm having a real brain fade today. I eagerly await someone competent answering this question. :P –  detly Mar 15 '12 at 8:47
    
@detly No, it doesn't consume the generator. You can write a generator that print when yielding and test. –  satoru Mar 15 '12 at 8:48
    
Yeah, I realised that when I tested it (although it consumes the first item). That's why I deleted my original comment :P –  detly Mar 15 '12 at 8:58
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This zip stuff eats the first item yielded, so it is not a good idea as well.

You can only detect if a generator has an item yielding by getting and keeping it until needed. The following class will help you to do so.

If needed, it gets an item from the iterator and keeps it.

If asked for emptyness (if myiterwatch: ...), it tries to get and returns if it could get one.

If asked for the next item, it will return the retrieved one or a new one.

class IterWatch(object):
    def __init__(self, it):
        self.iter = iter(it)
        self._pending = []
    @property
    def pending(self):
        try:
            if not self._pending:
                # will raise StopIteration if exhausted
                self._pending.append(next(self.iter))
        except StopIteration:
            pass # swallow this
        return self._pending
    def next(self):
        try:
            return self.pending.pop(0)
        except IndexError:
            raise StopIteration
    __next__ = next # for Py3
    def __iter__(self): return self
    def __nonzero__(self):
        # returns True if we have data.
        return not not self.pending
        # or maybe bool(self.pending)
    __bool__ = __nonzero__ # for Py3

This solves the problem in a very generic way. If you have an iterator which you just want to test, you can use

guard = object()
result = return_generator()
if next(result, guard) is not guard:
    print 'Yes, the generator did generate something!'

next(a, b) returns b if iterator a is exhausted. So if it returns the guard in our case, it didn't generate something, otherwise it did.

But your zip() approach is perfectly valid as well...

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, considering conditions that I want to use the generator later, I have to do something to restore the consumed "first element". But I think this is really rare, because in this case I would just iterate over the generator without even checking beforehand. –  satoru Mar 15 '12 at 8:59
    
Thanks for explaining the second parameter of next :) –  satoru Mar 15 '12 at 9:07
add comment

here is one way using itertools tee function which duplicates the generator:

from itertools import tee
a, b = tee(xrange(0))
try:
    next(a)
    print list(b)
except StopIteration:
    print "f1 was empty"


a, b = tee(xrange(3))
try:
    next(a)
    print list(b)
except StopIteration:
    print "f2 was empty"

>>>
[0, 1, 2, 3]
f2 was empty
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for teaching me something. Is there anything itertools can't do? –  Li-aung Yip Mar 15 '12 at 9:28
1  
thanks. Just be careful that if one of the iterables (a or b) gets far ahead of the other iterable, all its generated values must be stored in a list for the other iterable to later get. So this solution may use lots of memory. I have suggested a better solution. –  robert king Mar 15 '12 at 9:30
    
def f(n): return (i for i in range(n)), tee(f(10)), tee(f(0)) would be an alternative –  glglgl Mar 15 '12 at 10:45
add comment

Instead of returning the generator, just use it? Here's an example of a generator that may or may not return results - if there are results action is taken, if there are no results no action is taken.

#!/usr/bin/python

import time

def do_work():
    if int(time.time()) % 2:
        for a in xrange(0,100):
            yield a

for thing in do_work():
    print thing
share|improve this answer
    
Normally, this might work, but there could be situations where this could not work. –  glglgl Mar 15 '12 at 8:54
1  
Well, I'm on the edge of my seat.. what type of situations? –  synthesizerpatel Mar 15 '12 at 9:00
    
@glglgl : such as? (It might be worth elaborating in your existing answer.) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 15 '12 at 9:01
1  
Consider you have to prepare something before using the generated items. This preparation might be expensive and could be omitted if there are no items to process. One could put the preparation into the loop and set a flag if it is done, but it looks nicer (IMHO) to put it before the loop. –  glglgl Mar 15 '12 at 9:05
add comment

Here are the two most simple solutions for your situation that I can think of:

def f1():
    return (i for i in range(10))

def f2():
    return (i for i in range(0))


def has_next(g):
    try:
        from itertools import chain
        return chain([g.next()],g)
    except StopIteration:
        return False

g = has_next(f1())
if g:
    print list(g)

g = has_next(f2())
if g:
    print list(g)


def has_next(g):
    for i in g:
        return chain([i],g)
    return False

g = has_next(f1())
if g:
    print list(g)

g = has_next(f2())
if g:
    print list(g)
share|improve this answer
    
The for i in g: return chain([i],g) took me a while to understand. But it's fine :-) –  glglgl Mar 15 '12 at 10:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.